Etymology
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diglot (adj.)
Origin and meaning of diglot

also diglott, "using, speaking, or written in two languages," 1863, from Greek diglottos, from di- "two" (see di- (1)) + glōtta, variant of glōssa "tongue" (see gloss (n.2)). Related: Diglottic.

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match-board (n.)

in carpentry, "a board which has a tongue cut along one edge and a groove in the opposite edge," 1851, from match (n.2) + board (n.1). Matched, of boards so cut, is attested from 1837.

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blather (v.)

"talk nonsense," 1520s, blether, Scottish, probably from a Scandinavian source such as Old Norse blaðra "mutter, wag the tongue," which is perhaps of imitative origin, or from Proto-Germanic *blodram "something inflated" (the source of bladder). Related: Blathered; blathering.

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idiolect (n.)

one's personal way of using a language, 1948, from idio- "one's own, personal" + second element abstracted from dialect. Idioglottic (1888) has a sense "using words invented in one's mind" (from Greek glotta/glossa "tongue").

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fucker (n.)

1590s, "one who copulates," agent noun from fuck (v.). By 1893 as a general term of abuse (or admiration).

DUCK F-CK-R. The man who has the care of the poultry on board a ſhip of war. ["Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue," 1796]
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warm (v.)

Old English wyrman "make warm" and wearmian "become warm;" from the root of warm (adj.). Phrase warm the bench is sports jargon first recorded 1907. Related: Warmed; warming.

SCOTCH WARMING PAN. A wench. [Grose, "Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue," 1785]
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palatal (adj.)

1728, of sounds, "uttered by the aid of the palate," from palate + -al (1). By 1786 as "of or pertaining to the roof of the mouth." As a noun, "a sound or letter usually produced by the upper surface of the tongue against a part of the palate," by 1762.

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nettled (adj.)

"vexed, irritated," c. 1400, figurative adjectival use of past participle of nettle (v.).

Nettled. Teized, provoked, out of temper. He or she has pissed on a nettle; said of one who is pevish or out of temper. [Grose, "Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue," 1785] 
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bugloss (n.)

popular name of several small plants, 1530s, from French buglosse, from Latin buglossa, from Greek bouglossos, literally "ox-tongued," from bous "ox" (from PIE root *gwou- "ox, bull, cow") + glōssa "tongue" (see gloss (n.2)) . So called from the shape and texture of its leaves.

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glossolalia (n.)

"gift of tongues, speaking in tongues, ability to speak foreign languages without having learned them," 1857 (earlier in German and Italian), from Greek glōssa "tongue, language" (see gloss (n.2)) + lalia "talk, prattle, a speaking," from lalein "to speak, prattle," echoic.

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