Etymology
Advertisement
timely (adv.)
late Old English timlic "quickly, soon;" see time (n.) + -ly (2). As an adjective meaning "occurring at a suitable time" it is attested from c. 1200.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
springtime (n.)
also spring-time, late 15c., from spring (n.1) + time (n.).
Related entries & more 
beforetime (adv.)
"in former times," c. 1300, from before + time (n.). Related: Beforetimes.
Related entries & more 
peacetime (n.)

also peace-time, "time when a country is not at war," 1550s, from peace + time (n.).

Related entries & more 
flextime (n.)
also short for flexitime, 1972, translating German Gleitzeit "sliding time." See flex + time (n.).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
timing (n.)
mid-13c., "a happening," verbal noun from time (v.). From 1590s as "the noting or recording of time;" 1915 as "coordination of moving parts in a machinery."
Related entries & more 
mealtime (n.)

also meal-time, "usual time for eating a meal," early 13c., from meal (n.1) + time (n.). Etymologically a tautology.

Related entries & more 
sometime (adv.)
late 13c., "at one time or another" (adv.); as an adjective, late 15c. Meaning "at some future time" is late 14c. From some + time (n.).
Related entries & more 
bedtime (n.)
also bed-time, "the usual hour of going to rest," early 13c., from bed (n.) + time (n.). Bed-time story attested from 1867.
Related entries & more 
downtime (n.)

also down-time, 1952, "time when a machine or vehicle is out of service or otherwise unavailable;" from down (adj.) + time (n.). Of persons, "opportunity for rest and relaxation," by 1982.

Related entries & more 

Page 5