Etymology
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enshrine (v.)

in early use also inshrine, "enclose in or as in a shrine; deposit for safe-keeping," 1580s, from en- (1) "make, put in" + shrine (n.). Related: Enshrined; enshrining.

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CD 

1979 as an abbreviation of compact disc as a digital system of information storage. By 1959 as an abbreviation of certificate of deposit "written statement from a bank acknowledging it has received a sum of money from the person named" (1819).

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gage (v.)

c. 1400, "to deposit as security," from Old French gager, gagier "to guarantee, promise, pledge, swear; bet, wager; pay," from gage "security, pledge" (see gage (n.)). Related: Gaged; gaging. For the measuring sense, see gauge (v.).

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hoard (v.)

"to treasure up, collect, and store; amass and deposit for preservation or security or for future use," Old English hordian, from the root of hoard (n.). Cognate with Old High German gihurten, German gehorden, Gothic huzdjan. Related: Hoarded; hoarding.

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gall (n.3)

"excrescence on a plant caused by the deposit of insect eggs," especially on an oak leaf, late 14c., from Latin galla "oak-gall," which is of uncertain origin. They were harvested for use in medicines, inks, dyes.

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blow-fly (n.)

a common name for species of flies and similar insects which deposit their eggs on flesh, and taint it, 1720, from fly (n.) + blow (v.1) in an obsolete sense "to deposit eggs, to infect with eggs" (1550s), in reference to insects, "apparently connected with old notions of natural history" [OED]. Hence also flyblown. But blow on or upon meaning "breathe (infectious breath, poison) upon; infect with disease, taint" is by c. 1300, and compare Middle English elf-blown "tainted." Blown also was used in other compounds for "stale from exposure to air," which flows into the senses of "tainted, unsavory; exposed to flies."

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mailbox (n.)

also mail-box, 1797, "box for mailbags on a coach," from mail (n.1) + box (n.1). Meaning "letterbox, box placed in some public place for the deposit of letters to be gathered by the postman," is by 1853, American English.

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plaque (n.)

1848, "ornamental plate or tablet," from French plaque "metal plate, coin" (15c.), perhaps through Flemish placke "small coin," from Middle Dutch placke "disk, patch, stain," related to German Placken "spot, patch" (compare placard). Meaning "deposit on walls of arteries" is attested by 1891; that of "bacteria deposits on teeth" is by 1898.

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timewise (adv.)

also time-wise, 1898, from time (n.) + wise (n.).

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peacetime (n.)

also peace-time, "time when a country is not at war," 1550s, from peace + time (n.).

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