Etymology
Advertisement
constringent (adj.)

"causing constriction," c. 1600, from Latin constringentem (nominative constringens), present participle of constringere "to bind together, tie tightly, fetter, shackle, chain," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + stringere "to draw tight" (see strain (v.)).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
urge (v.)

1550s, from Latin urgere "to press hard, push forward, force, drive, compel, stimulate," perhaps [de Vaan] from a PIE root *urgh- "to tie, bind" (source also of Lithuanian veržti "tie, fasten, squeeze," vargas "need, distress," vergas "slave;" Old Church Slavonic vragu "enemy;" Gothic wrikan "persecute," Old English wrecan "drive, hunt, pursue"), via a notion of "to weigh down on," hence "to insist, impel." The other possibility is that the PIE root is *ureg- "to follow a track." Related: Urged; urging.

Related entries & more 
Ascot 
village near Windsor, Berkshire, literally "eastern cottage." The site of fashionable horse race meetings, hence its use attributively for clothes suitable for the event; especially a type of tie (1889).
Related entries & more 
knit (v.)
Old English cnyttan "to tie with a knot, bind together, fasten by tying," related to Old Norse knytja "bind together, form into a knot," Middle Low German knütten "to tie, knot," Old English cnotta "a knot," from Proto-Germanic *knuttjan, from stem *knutt-. Of brows, late 14c. Intransitive meaning "do knitting, weave by looping or knotting a continuous thread" (especially in reference to plain stitch) is from 1520s. Intransitive meaning "become compact or consolidated" is from c. 1600. Related: Knitted; knitting. For pronunciation, see kn-.
Related entries & more 
kedge (v.)
"to move (a ship) by means of a light cable attached to an anchor," 1620s, probably from a Scandinavian source or perhaps from cadge (v.) "to tie, fasten" (itself from Scandinavian); compare colloquial ketch from catch. Hence also kedge-anchor (1704) and its shortened form kedge (1769).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
lavalier (n.)
kind of ornament that hangs around the neck, 1873, from French lavallière, a kind of tie, after Louise Françoise de La Baume Le Blanc de La Vallière, Duchesse de La Vallière (1644-1710), mistress of Louis XIV from 1661-1667.
Related entries & more 
connect (v.)

mid-15c., "to join, bind, or fasten together," from Latin conectere "join together," from assimilated form of com "together" (see con-) + nectere "to bind, tie" (from PIE root *ned- "to bind, tie").

Displaced 16c. by connex (1540s), from French connexer, from Latin *connexare, a supposed frequentative of conectere (past participle stem connex-). Connect was re-established from 1670s.

A similar change took place in French, where connexer was superseded by connecter. Meaning "to establish a relationship" (with) is from 1881. Slang meaning "get in touch with" is attested by 1926, from telephone connections. Meaning "awaken meaningful emotions, establish rapport" is from 1942. Of a hit or blow, "to reach the target," from c. 1920. Related: Connected; connecting; connectedness.

Related entries & more 
bandanna (n.)
also often bandana, 1752, from Hindi bandhnu, a method of dyeing, from Sanskrit badhnati "binds" (because the cloth is tied in different places like modern tie-dye), from PIE root *bhendh- "to bind." Perhaps to English via Portuguese. Etymologically, the colors and spots are what makes it a bandanna.
Related entries & more 
septum (n.)

"wall separating two cavities," especially "the partition between the nostrils," 1690s, Modern Latin, from Latin saeptum "a fence, enclosure, partition," from neuter past participle of saepire "to hedge in," from saepes"a hedge, a fence," which de Vaan suggests is from a PIE *seh-i- "to tie." Related: Septal.

Related entries & more 
shoot-out (n.)

1953, "sustained exchange of gunfire;" the expression shoot it out "settle (a conflict, dispute, etc.) by an exchange of gunfire" is from 1912; see shoot (v.) + out (adv.). As a type of sports tie-breaker, by 1978.

Related entries & more 

Page 5