Etymology
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shower (v.)

1570s, "come down in showers;" 1580s, "to discharge a shower on; wet copiously with or as with liquid sprayed," from shower (n.1). Intransitive sense of "take a shower" is by 1930. Related: Showered; showering.

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depose (v.)

c. 1300, "to remove from office, especially from royalty," from Old French deposer (12c.), from de- "down" (see de-) + poser "put, place" (see pose (v.1)). Meaning "testify to, attest," especially "give testimony on oath" is from early 15c.; sense of "take testimony from or examine under oath" is from 1560s. Literal sense of "lay down, let fall" (early 15c.) is obsolete. Related: Deposed; deposing.

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kick-start (v.)

1919 (implied in kick-starter), "method of starting an internal combustion engine (of a motorcycle) by pushing down a lever with the foot," from kick (n.) + start (n.). Figurative sense of "take a course of action that will quickly start a process" is by 1995.

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catalepsy (n.)

"an attack or abnormal state of muscular rigidity in the limbs," late 14c., cathalempsia, from Medieval Latin catalepsia, from Late Latin catalepsis, from Greek katalepsis "a seizure, a seizing upon, a taking possession," from kataleptos "seized," from katalambanein "to seize upon," from kata "down" (see cata-) + lambanein "to take" (see lemma).

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succumb (v.)
late 15c., from Old French succomber "succumb, die, lose one's (legal) case," and directly from Latin succumbere "submit, surrender, yield, be overcome; sink down; lie under; cohabit with," from assimilated form of sub "under, beneath" (see sub-) + -cumbere "take a reclining position," related to cubare "lie down" (see cubicle). Originally transitive; sense of "sink under pressure" is first recorded c. 1600. As a euphemism for "to die," from 1849. Related: Succumbed; succumbing.
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cathode (n.)

"negative pole of an electric current," 1834, from Latinized form of Greek kathodos "a way down," from kata "down" (see cata-) + hodos "a way, path, track, road," a word of uncertain origin (see Exodus). Proposed by the Rev. William Whewell, English polymath, and published by English chemist and physicist Michael Faraday. So called from the path the electric current was supposed to take. Related: Cathodic; cathodal. Cathode ray first attested 1880, but the phenomenon known from 1859; cathode ray tube is from 1905.

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devour (v.)

early 14c., devouren, of beasts or persons, "to eat up entirely, eat ravenously, consume as food," from Old French devorer (12c.) "devour, swallow up, engulf," from Latin devorare "swallow down, accept eagerly," from de "down" (see de-) + vorare "to swallow" (from PIE root *gwora- "food, devouring"). Of persons or inanimate agents (fire, pestilence, etc.) "consume destructively or wastefully," late 14c. To "swallow up" figuratively (a book, etc.) from 1580s; to "take in ravenously" with the eyes, 1620s. Related: Devoured; devouring.

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procumbent (adj.)

1660s, in biology, "unable to support itself, lying on the ground without putting forth roots," from Latin procumbentem (nominative procumbens), present participle of procumbere "to fall forward, fall prostrate," from pro "forward" (see pro-) + -cumbere "take a reclining position," related to cubare "lie down" (see cubicle). The meaning "leaning forward, lying on the face" is from 1721. Related: Procumbently.

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downy (adj.)

"covered with down; resembling down," 1570s, from down (n.1) + -y (2). Related: Downiness.

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duvet (n.)

"quilt or comforter stuffed with down," 1758, from French duvet "down," earlier dumet, diminutive of dum "down."

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