Etymology
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dopey (adj.)

"sluggish, stupefied," with or as with a narcotic drug; also "stupid" generally, 1896, from dope (n.) + -y (2). Related: Dopiness.

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mome (n.)

"buffoon, fool, stupid person," 1550s, from Old French mome "a mask. Related" Momish. The adjective introduced by "Lewis Carroll" is an unrelated nonsense word.

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puddinghead (n.)

"amiable stupid person," 1851, from pudding + head (n.). Pudding-face for "person having a fat, round, smooth face" is from 1748.

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cluck (n.)

1703, "sound made by a hen," from cluck (v.). Slang meaning "stupid person" (chickens and turkeys are famously foolish) is from 1927.

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meshuga (adj.)

"mad, crazy, stupid," 1892, from Hebrew meshugga, participle of shagag "to go astray, wander." The adjective has forms meshugener, meshugenah before a noun.

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bonehead (n.)

"stupid person," 1908, from bone (n.) + head (n.). Compare blockhead, meathead. Bone-headed "ignorant" is from 1903. Earlier it was used in reference to types of primitive spears or harpoons.

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hard-headed (adj.)
also hardheaded, 1580s, "stubborn," from hardhead "dull person" (1510s), from hard (adj.) + -headed. Meaning "practical, shrewd" is attested from 1779. Compare Dutch hardhoofdig "stupid."
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bird-brain (n.)
also birdbrain, 1936, slang, "stupid person," also perhaps suggestive of flightiness, from bird (n.1) + brain (n.). Bird-brained is attested from 1910 and bird-witted from c. 1600.
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mutt (n.)

1901, "stupid or foolish person," probably a shortening of muttonhead (1803) in the same sense; see mutton and compare meathead, etc. Mutt was used by 1898 of a dog, especially a stupid one, and perhaps this is the same word formed independently (muttonhead also was used of stupid animals), or else a separate word of unknown derivation. Wright's "English Dialect Dictionary" (1900) has "Mutton! used in scolding a dog, prob. in allusion to the offence of sheep-worrying."

"That dog ain't no mutt," McManus would say as he stood behind the bar opening oysters; "no an he ain't no rube! Say! he's in it all the time when Charley trims the steaks." [Robert W. Chambers, "The Haunts of Men," 1898]

Used by 1910 in dog fancier publications to refer to a non-purebred animal.

Mutt and Jeff is by 1917 in reference to "a pair of stupid men, affable losers," or to one tall (Mutt) and one short (Jeff), from the comic strip characters from the heyday of the newspaper funny pages, Augustus Mutt and Jim Jeffries, in U.S. cartoonist Henry Conway ("Bud") Fisher's strip, which debuted in 1907.

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pothead (n.)
also pot-head "chronic marijuana user," 1967, from pot (n.2) + head (n.). Earlier it meant "stupid person" (1530s), from pot (n.1).
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