Etymology
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outgun (v.)

"to surpass in guns, have more firepower than," 1690s, from out- + gun. Related: Outgunned; outgunning.

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zip (n.1)

"sound of something moving rapidly," 1875, imitative. Zip gun "homemade pistol" is attested by 1950.

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pom-pom (n.)
"Maxim automatic gun," 1899, of imitative origin, soldiers' slang from the Boer War. For the ornamental tuft, see pompom.
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Sten (n.)
type of light, rapid-fire submachine gun, 1942, from initials of surnames of designers R.V. Shepherd and H.J. Turpin + En(field); compare Bren.
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handgun (n.)
mid-14c., of unmounted firearms, from hand (n.) + gun (n.). In modern use, "a pistol," from 1930s, American English.
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Hotchkiss (n.)
1878, type of machine gun named for its inventor, U.S. armaments-maker Benjamin B. Hotchkiss (1826-1885). In Japanese, the word for "stapler" is hotchikisu after the E. H. Hotchkiss Company of Norwalk, Connecticut, U.S., early and prominent manufacturer of staplers (incorporated 1895, name from 1897), which apparently was run by relatives of the gun inventor. The surname (attested from late 15c. as Hochekys) is a variant of Hodgkin.
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breech (v.)
late 15c., "put in breeches," from breeches. Meaning "fit a gun with a breech" is from 1757, from breech (n.). Related: Breeched; breeching.
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double-barreled (adj.)

1709, of a gun, "having two barrels;" see double (adj.) + barrel (n.). Figurative sense of "serving two purposes" is by 1777.

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Uzi 
1959, trademark name for Israeli-made submachine gun, developed by Usiel Gal (1923–2002), and manufactured by IMI.
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fowl (v.)
Old English fuglian "to catch birds," from the source of fowl (n.). Related: Fowled; fowling. Fowling-piece "gun used for shooting wildfowl" is from 1590s.
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