Etymology
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Audrey 

fem. proper name, 13c., from earlier Aldreda (11c.), contracted from Etheldreda, a Latinized form of Old English Æðelðryð, literally "noble might," from æðele "noble" (see atheling) + ðryð "strength, might," from Proto-Germanic *thruthitho- "strength" (source also of Old Norse Þruðr, name of the daughter of Thor). Popularized by the reputation of Saint Etheldreda, queen of Northumbria and foundress of the convent at Ely.

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amain (adv.)
"with violence, strength, or force," 1530s, from main (adj.) by analogy with other words in a- (such as afoot).
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backbone (n.)
"spine, vertebral column," early 14c., from back (n.) + bone (n.). Figurative sense of "firmness of purpose, strength of character" is by 1843.
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enfeeble (v.)
"to cause to weaken, deprive of strength," mid-14c., from Old French enfeblir "become weak," from en- (see en- (1)) + feble (see feeble). Related: Enfeebled; enfeebling; enfeeblement.
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emasculation (n.)

"the act of depriving a male of the function which characterizes the sex; castration," also more generally "the act of depriving of vigor or strength," 1620s, noun of action from emasculate.

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restorative (adj.)

"capable of restoring health or strength," late 14c., restoratif, from Old French restoratif, restauratif, from restorer (see restore) or from Medieval Latin restaurativus.

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Herculean (adj.)
1590s, from Hercules + -an. "Of enormous size or strength or great courage," also sometimes "very difficult or dangerous," in allusion to the hero's labors.
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sforzando (adj.)

"with sudden energy or impulse," 1801, from Italian sforzando, present participle of sforza "to force," from Vulgar Latin *exfortiare "to show strength" (see effort).

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corroborate (v.)

1520s, "to give (legal) confirmation to," from Latin corroboratus, past participle of corroborare "to strengthen, invigorate," from assimilated form of com "with, together," here perhaps "thoroughly" (see com-) + roborare "to make strong," from robur, robus "strength," (see robust).

Meaning "to strengthen by evidence, to confirm" is from 1706. Sometimes 16c.-18c. in its literal Latin sense "make strong or add strength to," especially of medicines. Related: Corroborated; corroborating; corroborative.

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dilute (v.)
Origin and meaning of dilute

1550s, figurative, "to weaken, remove the strength or force of," from Latin dilutus, past participle of diluere "dissolve, wash away, dilute," from dis- "apart" (see dis-) + -luere, combining form of lavere "to wash" (from PIE root *leue- "to wash").

Literal sense of "render more liquid, make more thin or fluid; weaken by admixture of water or other liquid" is from 1660s. Related: Diluted; diluting. As an adjective, "thin, attenuated, reduced in strength," from c. 1600.

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