Etymology
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contraption (n.)

a slighting word for "a device, a contrivance," 1825, western England dialect, origin obscure, perhaps from con(trive) + trap, or deception.

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capacitor (n.)

"device which stores electricity," 1926, from capacity, in reference to electrical conductors, with Latinate agent-noun ending.

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pager (n.)

"device that emits a signal when activated by a telephone call," 1968, agent noun from page (v.1).

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fuse (n.)

"combustible cord or tube for lighting an explosive device," also fuze, 1640s, from Italian fuso, literally "spindle" (the ignition device so called for its shape, because the originals were long, thin tubes filled with gunpowder), from Latin fusus "a spindle," which is of uncertain origin. Influenced by French cognate fusée "spindleful of hemp fiber," and obsolete English fusee "musket fired by a fuse," which is from French. Meaning "device that breaks an electrical circuit" is first recorded 1884, so named for its shape, but erroneously attributed to fuse (v.) because it melts.

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repository (n.)

late 15c. (Caxton), "vessel, etc., for storage," from French repositoire or directly from Late Latin repositorium "store," in classical Latin, "a stand on which food is placed," from noun use of repositus, past participle of reponere "put away, store" (see repose (v.2)).

The figurative sense of "place where anything immaterial is thought of as stored" is recorded from 1640s; commercial sense of "place where things are kept for sale" is by 1759.

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air-freshener (n.)

"device to disperse chemicals meant to mask unpleasant odors," 1945, from air (n.1) + agent noun from freshen.

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transformer (n.)

c. 1600, "one who or that which transforms," agent noun from transform (v.). Meaning "device to reduce electrical currents" is from 1882.

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backscratcher (n.)

also back-scratcher, "rod or other device for scratching one's own back," 1834; see back (n.) + scratch (v.).

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sandbox (n.)

also sand-box, 1570s as a perforated device to sprinkle sand, from sand (n.) + box (n.1). From 1680s as "a box holding sand." In U.S. locomotives, "a device to put sand on the rails when wet wheels slip" (by 1849). By 1891 as a low-sided sand-pit for children's play.

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dehumidifier (n.)

"device for removing humidity from the air," 1909, agent noun from dehumidify (1908); see de- + humidify.

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