Etymology
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sashay (v.)

1836, "perform a gliding step in dancing," a mangled Englishing of French chassé "gliding step" (in ballet), literally "chased," past participle of chasser "to chase," from Old French chacier "to hunt" (see chase (v.)).  Also compare catch, and for spelling see sash (n.2). Hence "to perform a casual walk or glide; move diagonally or irregularly," and "walk ostentatiously or provocatively." Related: Sashayed; sashaying. As a noun, "a venture, excursion," by 1900; as the name of a square-dancing step by 1940.

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ecbatic (adj.)
"drawn from the relationship of cause and effect," especially of arguments, 1836, from ecbasis, from Latin ecbasis, from Greek ekbasis "a going out, issue, event," from ek- "out" (see ex-) + basis "a step, a base," from bainein "to go, walk, step," from PIE root *gwa- "to go, come."
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stumble (n.)
1540s, "act of stumbling," from stumble (v.). Meaning "a failure, false step" is from 1640s.
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basis (n.)

1570s, "bottom or foundation" (of something material), from Latin basis "foundation," from Greek basis "a going, a step; a stand, base, that whereon one stands," from bainein "to go, walk, step" (from PIE root *gwa- "to go, come"). The transferred and figurative senses (of immaterial things) are from c. 1600.

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quick-march (n.)

"a quick-step, a march in quick time," 1752, from quick (adj.) + march (n.1).

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tread (n.)
early 13c., "a step or stepping, pressure with the foot," from tread (v.); in reference to automobile tires, it is recorded from 1906.
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ballon (n.)
"smoothness in dancing, lightness of step," 1830, from French ballon, literally "balloon" (see balloon (n.)).
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demarche (n.)

1650s, "walk, step, manner of proceeding," from French démarche (15c.) literally "gait, walk, bearing," from démarcher (12c.) "to march," from de- (see de-) + marcher (see march (v.)). Meaning "a diplomatic step" attested from 1670s. A word never quite nativized, though it appears in Century Dictionary (1897) as demarch.

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transgress (v.)
Origin and meaning of transgress

late 15c., transgressen, "to sin," from Old French transgresser (14c.), from Latin transgressus, past participle of transgredi "step across, step over; climb over, pass, go beyond," from trans "across, beyond" (see trans-) + gradi (past participle gressus) "to walk, go" (from PIE root *ghredh- "to walk, go") . Related: Transgressed; transgressing.

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sura (n.)
chapter of the Quran, 1610s, from Arabic surah, literally "step, degree." Compare Hebrew shurah "row, line."
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