Etymology
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craziness (n.)

c. 1600, "infirmity, state of being broken down," from crazy + -ness. Oldest sense is now obsolete. The meaning "state of being flawed or damaged" is from 1660s; that of "mental unsoundness" is from 1755.

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pendency (n.)

1630s, "state of being undecided or in continuance," from pendent + abstract noun suffix -cy. The more literal sense of "state of being suspended" (1770) is rare. Related: Pendence (1620s).

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messy (adj.)

1843, "untidy, in a state of disorder or dirtiness," from mess (n.) "state of confusion" + -y (2). Figurative use ("unethical") is attested by 1924. Related: Messily; messiness.

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toxicity (n.)

"state of being toxic," 1880, from toxic + -ity.

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temper (n.)

late 14c., "due proportion of elements or qualities," from temper (v.). The sense of "characteristic state of mind, inclination, disposition" is first recorded 1590s; that of "calm state of mind, tranquility" in c. 1600; and that of "angry state of mind" (for bad temper) in 1828. Meaning "degree of hardness and resiliency in steel" is from late 15c.

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hush (n.)

"state of stillness," 1680s, from hush (v.).

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nationhood (n.)

"state of being a nation," 1840, from nation + -hood.

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apartness (n.)

"state of being apart," 1849, from apart + -ness.

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popularness (n.)

"state of being popular," 1727, from popular + -ness.

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imperium (n.)

"authority to command the national military forces," in extended use "an empire," 1650s, from Latin imperium "command, supreme authority, power" (see empire). Hence Latin phrase imperium in imperio "a state within a state."

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