Etymology
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phoneme (n.)

"distinctive sound or group of sounds," 1889, from French phonème, from Greek phōnēma "a sound made, voice," from phōnein "to sound or speak," from phōnē "sound, voice" (from PIE root *bha- (2) "to speak, tell, say"). Related: Phonematic.

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loquacity (n.)
c. 1200, from Latin loquacitatem (nominative loquacitas) "talkativeness," from loquax "talkative," from loqui "to speak" (from PIE root *tolkw- "to speak"). An Old English word for it was ofersprecolnes. Compare French loquacité, Spanish locuacidad, Italian loquacità.
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extemporize (v.)
1640s (implied in extemporizing), "to speak ex tempore," from extempore + -ize. Related: Extemporized.
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alexia (n.)
"inability to read" as a result of some mental condition, 1878, from Greek a- "not" (see a- (3)) + abstract noun from lexis "a speaking or reading," from legein "to speak," from PIE root *leg- (1) "to collect, gather," with derivatives meaning "to speak (to 'pick out words')."
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vox 

Latin, literally "voice," which is the source of vocare "to call" (from PIE root *wekw- "to speak").

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boast (v.)
mid-14c., "to brag, speak arrogantly," from Anglo-French, from the same source as boast (n.). Meaning "speak with pride" is late 14c. Sense of "glory or exult in possessing" (something) is from 1540s; that of "possess something remarkable or admirable" is from 1690s. Related: Boasted; boasting.
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nefandous (adj.)

"not to be spoken of, abominable, very shocking to the general sense of justice or religion," 1630s, from Latin nefandus "unmentionable, impious, heinous," from ne-, negative particle (see un- (1)), + fandus "to be spoken," gerundive of fari "to speak," from PIE root *bha- (2) "to speak, tell, say."

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glossolalia (n.)

"gift of tongues, speaking in tongues, ability to speak foreign languages without having learned them," 1857 (earlier in German and Italian), from Greek glōssa "tongue, language" (see gloss (n.2)) + lalia "talk, prattle, a speaking," from lalein "to speak, prattle," echoic.

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sauce (v.)
mid-15c., "to season," from sauce (n.). From 1862 as "to speak impertinently." Related: Sauced; saucing.
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magniloquence (n.)

"exaggerated eloquence, loftiness of speech or expression," 1620s, from Latin magniloquentia "elevated language, lofty style," from magniloquus "pompous in talk, vaunting, boastful," from combining form of magnus "great" (from PIE root *meg- "great") + -loquus "speaking," from loqui "to speak" (from PIE root *tolkw- "to speak").

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