Etymology
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awkwardness (n.)
1704, "lack of grace, inelegance," from awkward + -ness. Meaning "physical clumsiness" is attested from 1770; that of "social embarrassment" by 1788.
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stomp (v.)
1803, variant of stamp. Related: Stomped; stomping. Noun meaning "lively social dance" is recorded from 1912 in jazz slang.
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minefield (n.)

"area of land planted with explosive mines," 1877, from mine (n.2) + field (n.). Figurative meaning, "subject or situation fraught with unseen dangers," is by 1947.

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bake (n.)
1560s, "process of baking," from bake (v.). As "social gathering at which baked food is served," 1846, American English.
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ball-club (n.)
also ballclub, "association of players of a ball game," 1845, from ball (n.1) + club (n.) in the "social organization" sense.
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nightclub (n.)
also night-club, "club open at night," 1894, from night + club (n.) in the social sense.
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clubbable (adj.)

"having qualities that make one fit to be a member of a social club," 1783, from club (n.) + -able.

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maladjustment (n.)

"faulty adjustment, lack of adjustment," 1823, from mal- + adjustment. In a psychological sense, "unsuccessful adaptation to one's social environment," by 1899.

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homophile (n.)
1960, from homo- (2) "homosexual" + -phile. An attempt to coin a word for a homosexual person as part of a social group, rather than a sexual deviant.
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patrilocal (adj.)

1906, in reference to the customs of certain social groups where a married couple settles in the husband's house or community, from patri- + local (adj.).

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