Etymology
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briefing (n.)
"fact or situation of giving preliminary instructions," 1910 (but popularized by World War II pre-flight conferences), verbal noun from brief (v.).
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misalliance (n.)

"marriage with a person of lower social position,"  1738, from mis- (1) "bad, wrong" + alliance. Compare mesalliance.

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predicament (n.)

early 15c., in philosophy, "category, class; one of Aristotle's 10 categories," from Medieval Latin predicamentum, from Late Latin praedicamentum "quality, category, something predicted, that which is asserted," from Latin praedicatus, past participle of praedicare "assert, proclaim, declare publicly," from prae- "forth, before" (see pre-) + dicare "proclaim" (from PIE root *deik- "to show," also "pronounce solemnly," and see diction). Praedicamentum is a loan-translation of Greek kategoria, Aristotle's word.

The meaning "unpleasant, dangerous, or trying situation" is a particular negative use of the general sense of "a state of being, condition, situation" (1580s).

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antarchism (n.)
"opposition to all social government or control of individuals by law," 1845, from antarchy + -ism. Related: Antarchist; antarchistic.
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sociality (n.)
1640s, from French socialité or directly from Latin socialitas "fellowship, sociableness," from socialis (see social (adj.)).
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awkwardness (n.)
1704, "lack of grace, inelegance," from awkward + -ness. Meaning "physical clumsiness" is attested from 1770; that of "social embarrassment" by 1788.
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stomp (v.)
1803, variant of stamp. Related: Stomped; stomping. Noun meaning "lively social dance" is recorded from 1912 in jazz slang.
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bake (n.)
1560s, "process of baking," from bake (v.). As "social gathering at which baked food is served," 1846, American English.
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ball-club (n.)
also ballclub, "association of players of a ball game," 1845, from ball (n.1) + club (n.) in the "social organization" sense.
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nightclub (n.)
also night-club, "club open at night," 1894, from night + club (n.) in the social sense.
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