Etymology
Advertisement
underclass (n.)

"subordinate social class," 1894, from under (adj.) + class (n.). A loan-translation of Swedish underklass.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
reorganization (n.)

also re-organization, "act or process of organizing anew," 1801, in translations from French, from French reorganisation or a native noun of action from reorganize.

Related entries & more 
sociobiology (n.)

"study of the biological basis of social behavior," 1946, from socio- + biology. Related: Sociobiological.

Related entries & more 
socio- 

word-forming element meaning "social, of society; social and," also "having to do with sociology," from combining form of Latin socius "companion, ally, associate, fellow, sharer," from PIE *sokw-yo-, suffixed form of root *sekw- (1) "to follow." Common in compounds since c. 1880.

Related entries & more 
affiliate (n.)

1846, from affiliate (v.) via the adjective. Compare associate (n.). Affiliated society in reference to a local society connected with another or associated with a central organization is attested from 1795.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Ku Klux Klan 

1867, American English, originally Kuklux Klan, a made-up name, supposedly from Greek kuklos, kyklos "circle" (see cycle (n.)) + English clan. Originally an organization of former Confederate officers and soldiers, it was put down by the U.S. military in the 1870s. Revived 1915 as a national racist Protestant fraternal organization, it grew to prominence but fractured in the 1930s. It had a smaller national revival 1950s as an anti-civil rights group, later with anti-government leanings. In late 19c. often simply Kuklux.

Related entries & more 
-lect 

word-forming element abstracted 20c. from dialect and in words meaning a regional or social variety of a language.

Related entries & more 
clubby (adj.)

"of a social disposition," 1859, from club (n.) in the associative sense + -y (2). Related: Clubbily; clubbiness.

Related entries & more 
emancipated (adj.)

1726, "set free," past-participle adjective from emancipate (v.). Meaning "freed from custom or social restraints" is from 1850.

Related entries & more 
corporatism (n.)

"principal or practice of corporate organization," 1880, from corporate + -ism. Used over the years in various senses of corporate; in 1920s-30s often with reference to fascist collectivism.

Related entries & more 

Page 5