Etymology
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eyehole (n.)

also eye-hole, 1630s, "cavity or socket containing the orbit of the eye," from eye (n.) + hole (n.). By 1856 as "hole or opening, as in a mask or in a curtain or door, through which one may look, a peep hole."  

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buckeye (n.)
also buck-eye, "American horse-chestnut tree," 1763, said to be so called from resemblance of the nut to a stag's eye (see buck (n.1) + eye (n.)). Meaning "native of Ohio" is attested since 1822, from the great number of such trees growing there. Used figuratively in early 20c. of anything cheap or inferior.
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cant (n.2)
"slope, slant," late 14c., first in Scottish writing and apparently meaning "edge, brink," a word of uncertain origin. "words identical in form and corresponding in sense are found in many languages, Teutonic, Slavonic, Romanic, Celtic" [OED]. It was rare in English before c. 1600. Meaning "slope, slanting or tilting position" is from 1847.

Perhaps via Old North French cant "corner" (itself perhaps via Middle Low German kante or Middle Dutch kant), from Vulgar Latin *canthus, from Latin cantus "iron tire of a wheel," which is possibly from a Celtic word meaning "rim of wheel, edge, brim" (compare Welsh cant "bordering of a circle, tire, edge," Breton cant "circle"). The ultimate connections of these are uncertain. Greek kanthos "corner of the eye," and Russian kutu "corner" sometimes are suggested, but there are difficulties (see Beekes).
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seeing (adj.)
c. 1300, present-participle adjective from see (v.). Seeing Eye dog first attested 1929, American English, trademarked by Seeing Eye Inc. of New Jersey.
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whammy (n.)
often double whammy, "hex, evil eye," 1932, of unknown origin, popularized 1941 in Al Capp's comic strip "Li'l Abner," where it was the specialty of Evil-Eye Fleegle.
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ocular (adj.)

c. 1500, "of or pertaining to the eye," from Late Latin ocularis "of the eyes," from Latin oculus "an eye," from PIE root *okw- "to see." As a noun, "eyepiece of an optical instrument," 1835, from the adjective.

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eyelid (n.)
mid-13c., from eye (n.) + lid (n.).
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eyelash (n.)
1752, from eye (n.) + lash (n.). Related: Eyelashes.
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cockeyed (adj.)

1821, "squint-eyed," perhaps from cock (v.) in some sense + eye (n.). Figurative sense of "absurd, askew, crazy" is from 1896; that of "drunk" is attested from 1926. Cockeye "a squinting eye" is attested from 1825.

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