Etymology
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nuke (n.)

short for nuclear weapon, 1959, U.S. military slang (see nuclear). The verb is attested from 1962; the slang sense of "to cook in a microwave oven" is by 1987. Related: Nuked; nuking.

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jaw (v.)
1610s, "to catch in the jaws, devour," from jaw (n.). In slang from 1748, "to gossip, to speak;" 1810 as "to scold." Related: Jawed; jawing. Hence 19c. U.S. slang jawsmith "talkative person; loud-mouthed demagogue" (1887), nautical slang jaw-tackle "the mouth" (1829), and the back-formed colloquial noun jaw "rude talk, abusive clamor" (1748).
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homie (n.)
also homey, by 1970s, slang, short for homeboy (q.v.). OED reports the identical word is recorded from the 1920s in New Zealand slang in the sense "recently arrived British immigrant."
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perv (n.)

also perve, "a sexual pervert," 1944, slang shortening of (sexual) pervert (n.). As a slang verb, by 1941 as "to act erotically" (intransitive), by 1959 as "to eroticize" something (transitive).

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yack (v.)
also yak, "to talk, to chatter," 1950, slang, probably short for yackety-yacking "talk" (1947), probably echoic (compare Australian slang yacker "talk, conversation," 1882). Related: Yacked; yacking.
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OJ 
slang abbreviation of orange juice, attested by 1963.
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nad (n.)
also nads, 1980s, student slang shortening of gonad.
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prexy (n.)

1871, college slang, an extension or diminutive of prex.

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za (n.)
U.S. student slang shortening of pizza, attested from 1968.
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blooey (n.)
"ruin, smash," 1915, U.S. slang, probably imitative.
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