Etymology
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analyst (n.)

1650s, "one versed in algebraic analysis, mathematician skilled in algebraic geometry," from French analyste "a person who analyzes," from analyser, from analyse "analysis," from Medieval Latin analysis (see analysis). As a short form of psychoanalyst, attested from 1914; the one analyzed is an analysand (1933). Greek analyter meant "a deliverer."

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harmonic (adj.)

1560s, "relating to music," from Latin harmonicus, from Greek harmonikos "harmonic, musical, skilled in music," from harmonia (see harmony). From 1660s as "tuneful, harmonious; relating to harmony" (earlier as armonical "tuneful, harmonious," c. 1500). The noun, short for harmonic tone, is recorded from 1777. Related: Harmonically.

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biologist (n.)

"a student of the science of life," 1813, from biology + -ist. The earliest use is in reference to human life (with the Greek sense of bios, for which see bio-); in its modern scientific sense, "one skilled in or a student of the discipline of biology," by 1874. Biologian is attested from 1865.

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formulary (n.)

1540s, "collection of set forms," from French formulaire "collection of formulae," from noun use of Latin adjective formularius, from formula "a form" (see formula). As an adjective in English, "of the nature of a formula," 1728. The Latin adjective also was used as a noun meaning "a lawyer skilled in composing writs."

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virtuoso (n.)

1610s, "scholar, connoisseur," from Italian virtuoso (plural virtuosi), noun use of adjective meaning "skilled, learned, of exceptional worth," from Late Latin virtuosus (see virtuous). Meaning "person with great skill, one who is a master of the mechanical part of a fine art" (as in music) is first attested 1743.

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combatant 

mid-15c. (adj.) "contending, disposed to combat;" late 15c. (n.) "one who engages in battle;" from Old French combatant (Modern French combattant) "skilled at fighting, warlike" (also used as a noun in Old French), present-participle adjective of combattre (see combat (v.)).

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artful (adj.)

1610s, "learned, well-versed in the (liberal) arts," also "characterized by technical skill, artistic," from art (n.) + -ful. The meaning "cunning, crafty, skilled in adapting means to ends" is from 1739. Related: Artfully; artfulness. The Artful Dodger (Jack Dawkins) is from Dickens' "Oliver Twist" (1837-39).

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cosmetic (adj.)

1640s, "pertaining to beauty, improving beauty," from French cosmétique (16c.), from Latinized form of Greek kosmetikos "skilled in adornment or arrangement," from kosmein "to arrange, adorn," from kosmos "order; ornament" (see cosmos). Related: Cosmetical (1550s). Of surgery, from 1926. Figurative sense of "superficial, affecting the appearance only" is from 1955. Related: Cosmetically.

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professional (adj.)

mid-15c., profeshinalle, in reference to the profession of religious orders; see profession. By 1747 of careers, "pertaining to or appropriate to a profession or calling" (especially of the skilled or learned trades from c. 1793);  In sports and amusements, "undertaken or engaged in for money" (opposed to amateur), by 1846. Related: Professionally.

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optician (n.)

1680s, "person skilled in the science of optics, a sense now rare or obsolete; see optic + -ian. In the meaning "one who makes or sells optical instruments" it is attested from 1737, after French opticien "maker or seller of optical instruments," on the model of physician, etc.

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