Etymology
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settle (n.)
"long bench," 1550s, from Middle English setle "a seat," from Old English setl "a seat, stall; position, abode; setting of a heavenly body," related to sittan "to sit," from Proto-Germanic *setla- (source also of Middle Low German, Middle Dutch setel, Dutch zetel, German Sessel, Gothic sitls), from PIE *sedla- (source also of Latin sella "seat, chair," Old Church Slavonic sedlo "saddle," Old English sadol "saddle"), from root *sed- (1) "to sit."
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session (n.)

late 14c., "periodical sitting of a court," from Old French session "act or state of sitting; assembly," from Latin sessionem (nominative sessio) "act of sitting; a seat; loitering; a session," noun of action from past participle stem of sedere "to sit" (from PIE root *sed- (1) "to sit"). Sense of "period set aside for some activity" is first recorded 1920, in bull session, probably from quarter sessions courts (see quarter (n.1)). Musical sense of "recording occasion in a studio" is from 1927.

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seat (n.1)
"thing to sit on; act of sitting," c. 1200, from Old Norse sæti "seat, position," from Proto-Germanic *sæt- (source also of Old High German saze, Middle Dutch gesaete "seat," Old High German gisazi, German Gesäß "buttocks"), from PIE root *sed- (1) "to sit." Meaning "posterior of the body" (the sitting part) is from c. 1600; sense of "part of a garment which covers the buttocks" is from 1835. Seat belt is from 1915, originally in airplanes.
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decahedron (n.)

in geometry, "a solid having ten faces," 1828, from deca- "ten" + -hedron, from Greek hedra "seat, base, chair, face of a geometric solid," from PIE root *sed- (1) "to sit."  Related: Decahedral.

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dodecahedron (n.)

"solid having twelve faces," 1560s, from Greek dōdeka "twelve" (see dodeca-) + hedra "seat, base, chair, face of a geometric solid," from PIE root *sed- (1) "to sit." Related: Dodecahedral.

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assiento (n.)
1714, "contract between the King of Spain and another power," especially that made at the Peace of Utrecht, 1713, with Great Britain for furnishing African slaves to the Spanish colonies in the Americas (abrogated in 1750), from Spanish asiento, formerly assiento "a compact or treaty; a seat in court, a seat," from asentar/assentar "to adjust, settle, establish," literally "to place on a seat," from a sentar, from Latin ad "to" (see ad-) + sedens, present participle of sedere "to sit," from PIE root *sed- (1) "to sit."
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perch (v.)

"to roost, to alight or settle on or as on a perch; to occupy some elevated position," late 14c., from Old French perchier "to sit on a perch" (of a bird), from perche (n.); see perch (n.1). Related: Perched; perching.

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seat (v.)
1570s, "to be in a certain position" (implied in seated), from seat (n.2). Of diseases, in the body, from 1610s (hence deep-seated). Meaning "to cause to sit in a seat" is from 1610s, from seat (n.1). Related: Seated; seating.
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octahedron (n.)

"a solid figure bounded by eight plane faces," 1560s, from Greek oktahedron, neuter of oktahedros "eight-sided," from okta- "eight" (see octa-) + hedra "a seat; face of a geometrical solid," from PIE root *sed- (1) "to sit." Related: Octahedral.

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ersatz (adj.)
1875, from German Ersatz "units of the army reserve," literally "compensation, replacement, substitute," from ersetzen "to replace," from Old High German irsezzen, from ir-, unaccented variant of ur- (see ur-) + setzen "to set," from PIE root *sed- (1) "to sit." As a noun, from 1892.
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