Etymology
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revolutionize (v.)

1797, "to cause (a state, etc.) to undergo a (political) revolution, effect a change in the political constitution of;" see revolution + -ize. Transferred sense of "change a thing completely and fundamentally, effect radical change in" is by 1799. Related: Revolutionized; revolutionizing.

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alongside (adv.)
1707, "parallel to the side of," contraction of the prepositional phrase; see along + side (n.). Originally mostly nautical. As a preposition from 1793.
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feckless (adj.)
1590s, from feck, "effect, value, vigor" (late 15c.), Scottish shortened form of effect (n.), + -less. Popularized by Carlyle, who left its opposite, feckful, in dialectal obscurity. Related: Fecklessly; fecklessness.
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pleuro- 

before vowels pleur-, word-forming element meaning "pertaining to the side; pertaining to the pleura," from Greek pleura "the side, the ribs" (see pleura).

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sideboard (n.)
"table placed near the side of a room or hall" (especially one where food is served), c. 1300, from side (adj.) + board (n.1).
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aside (adv.)
c. 1300, "off to one side;" mid-14c., "to or from the side;" late 14c., "away or apart from a normal direction or position, out of the way," from a- (1) "on" + side (n.). Noun sense of "words spoken so as to be (supposed) inaudible" is from 1727. Middle English had asidely "on the side, indirectly" (early 15c.) and asideward "sideways, horizontal" (late 14c.). Used colloquially as a preposition from 1590s.
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fireside (n.)
also fire-side, 1560s, from fire (n.) + side (n.). Symbolic of home life by 1848. As an adjective from 1740s; especially suggesting the intimately domestic.
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weft (n.)
"threads which run across the web from side to side," Old English weft, wefta "weft," related to wefan "to weave," from Proto-Germanic *weftaz (see weave (v.)).
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sway (n.)
c. 1300, "movement from side to side," from sway (v.). The meaning "controlling influence" (as in to be under the sway of) is from 1510s, from a transitive sense of the verb in Dutch and other languages.
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cis- 

word-forming element meaning "on the near side of, on this side," from Latin preposition cis "on this side" (in reference to place or time), related to citra (adv.) "on this side," from PIE *ki-s, suffixed form of root *ko-, the stem of demonstrative pronoun meaning "this." Opposed to trans- or ultra-. Originally only of place, sometimes 19c. of time; 21c. of life situations (such as cis-gender, which is attested by 2011).

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