Etymology
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armchair (n.)
also arm-chair, "chair with rests for the elbows," 1630s, from arm (n.1) + chair (n.). Another old name for it was elbow-chair (1650s). Adjectival sense, in reference to "criticism of matters in which the critic takes no active part," is from 1886.
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brachial (adj.)
"belonging to the arm, fore-leg, wing," etc., 1570s, from Latin brachialis, from brachium (see brachio-).
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firth (n.)
"arm of the sea, estuary of a river," early 15c., Scottish, from Old Norse fjörðr (see fjord).
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armature (n.)
c. 1400, "an armed force," from Latin armatura "armor, equipment," from armatus, past participle of armare "to arm, furnish with weapons" from arma "weapons," literally "tools, implements (of war);" see arm (n.2). Meaning "armor" is mid-15c.; that of "protective covering of a plant or animal" is from 1660s. Electromagnetic sense is from 1835.
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bangle (n.)
"ornamental ring worn upon the arm or ankle," 1787, from Hindi bangri "colored glass bracelet or anklet."
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sidestep (n.)
also side-step, 1757, "a stepping to the side" (originally in military drill), from side (adj.) + step (n.). The verb is recorded from 1895; the figurative sense is attested from 1900.
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brachiosaurus (n.)
1903, Modern Latin, from Greek brakhion "an arm" (see brachio-) + -saurus. The forelegs are notably longer than the hind legs.
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disarm (v.)

late 14c., "deprive of power to injure or terrify, render harmless," a figurative sense, from Old French desarmer (11c.), from des- "reverse of" (see dis-) + armer "to arm" (see arm (v.)). The literal senses "deprive of weapons" (transitive), "put off one's armor or lay down one's weapons" (intransitive) are early 15c. Related: Disarmed; disarming; disarmingly.

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axillary (adj.)
"pertaining to the armpit or shoulder," 1610s, from Latin *axillaris, from axilla "armpit, upper arm, underpart of an upper wing" (see axle).
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sidelight (n.)
also side-light, c. 1600, "light coming from the side," from side (adj.) + light (n.). Figurative meaning "incidental information on a subject" is attested from 1862.
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