Etymology
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starship (n.)
"space ship," 1934 (in "Astounding Stories"), from star (n.) + ship (n.). Earlier in reference to celebrity.
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kingship (n.)
early 14c., from king (n.) + -ship. Old English had cynescipe.
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spaceship (n.)
1894, from space (n.) + ship (n.). Spaceship earth is from 1966.
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partisanship (n.)

"earnest or passionate adherence to a party or faction," 1831, from partisan + -ship.

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dictatorship (n.)

1580s, "office or term of a (Roman) dictator," from dictator + -ship. The sense of "absolute authority" evolved by late 17c.

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kinship (n.)
by 1764, from kin + -ship. Relationship covers the same sense but is a hybrid.
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marksmanship (n.)

"character or skill of a marksman; dexterity in shooting at the mark," 1823, from marksman + -ship.

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apostleship (n.)
1520s, from apostle + -ship. Old English had apostolhad (Middle English apostlehed).
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championship (n.)
1812, "position of a champion," from champion (n.) + -ship. Meaning "competition to determine a champion" is recorded from 1893.
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readership (n.)
1719, "office of a reader," from reader + -ship. Meaning "total number of readers of a publication" is from 1914.
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