Etymology
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earmark (n.)

mid-15c., from ear (n.1) + mark (n.1). Originally a cut or mark in the ear of sheep and cattle, serving as a sign of ownership (also a punishment of certain criminals); recorded from 1570s in the figurative sense of "stamp of ownership."

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meet (adj.)

c. 1300, mēte, "having the right shape or size," from Old English gemæte, Anglian *gemete, "suitable, having the same dimensions," from Proto-Germanic *ga-mætijaz (source also of Old Norse mætr, Old High German gimagi, German gemäß "suitable"), from collective prefix *ga- + PIE root *med- "take appropriate measures." The formation is the same as that of commensurate. Meaning "proper, appropriate" is from early 14c.; that of "fit (to do something)" is from late 14c.

The mountain sheep are sweeter,
But the valley sheep are fatter;
We therefore deem'd it meeter
To carry off the latter.
[Thomas Love Peacock, from "The War-song of Dinas Vawr"]
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wool-gathering (n.)
also woolgathering, 1550s, "indulging in wandering fancies and purposeless thinking," from the literal meaning "gathering fragments of wool torn from sheep by bushes, etc.," an activity that necessitates much wandering to little purpose. See wool + gather.
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slowpoke (n.)
also slow poke, 1848, American English from slow (adj.) + poke (n.3), the name of a device, like a yoke with a pole, attached to domestic animals such as pigs and sheep to keep them from escaping enclosures. Bartlett (1859) calls it "a woman's word."
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bellwether (n.)
also bell-wether, "lead sheep (on whose neck a bell was hung) of a domesticated flock," mid-14c. (late 13c. in Anglo-Latin; late 12c. as a surname), from bell (n.) + wether. Figurative sense of "chief, leader" is from mid-14c.
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suet (n.)
late 14c., "solid fat formed in the torsos of cattle and sheep," probably from an Anglo-French diminutive of Old French siu "fat, lard, grease, tallow" (Modern French suif), from Latin sebum "tallow, grease" (see sebum). Related: Suety.
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cordillera (n.)

"continuous ridge or range of mountains," 1704, from Spanish cordillera, "mountain chain," from cordilla, in Old Spanish "string, rope" (in modern Spanish "guts of sheep"), diminutive of cuerda, from Latin chorda "cord, rope" (see cord). Originally applied by the Spaniards to the Andes. Related: Cordilleran.

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reciprocornous (adj.)

"having horns turning backward and then forward," as a ram, 1775, with -ous + Latin reciprocornis, from reciprocus "turning back the same way" (see reciprocal) + cornu "horn" (see horn (n.)). "This form is characteristic of the sheep tribe, though not peculiar to it" [Century Dictionary].

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ricin (n.)

poison obtained from the castor-oil bean, 1888, from ricinus, genus name of the castor-oil plant (1694), from Latin ricinus (Pliny), a word of uncertain origin, perhaps the same word as ricinus "tick" (in sheep, dogs, etc.). Latin ricinum was used in late Old English herbariums.

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anthrax (n.)

late 14c., "severe boil or carbuncle," from Latin anthrax "virulent ulcer," from Greek anthrax "charcoal, live coal," also "carbuncle," which is of unknown origin; probably [Beekes] from a pre-Greek language. The specific sense in reference to a malignant disease in sheep and cattle (and occasionally humans) is from 1876.

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