Etymology
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preface (n.)

late 14c., "an introduction to the canon of the Mass," also "statement or statements introducing a discourse, book, or other composition; series of preliminary remarks, written or spoken," from Old French preface "opening part of sung devotions" (14c.) and directly from Medieval Latin prefatia, from Latin praefationem (nominative praefatio) "fore-speaking, introduction," in Medieval Latin "prologue," noun of action from past participle stem of praefari "to say beforehand," from prae "before" (see pre-) + fari "speak," from PIE root *bha- (2) "to speak, tell, say."

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aphonic (adj.)

"having no sound," 1827, with -ic + Greek aphonos "voiceless," from a- "not, without" (see a- (3)) + phōnē "voice" (from PIE root *bha- (2) "to speak, tell, say").

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enunciation (n.)
1550s, "a declaration," from Latin enuntiationem (nominative enuntiatio) "enunciation, declaration," noun of action from past participle stem of enuntiare "to speak out, say, express" (see enunciate). Meaning "articulation of words" is from 1750.
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adage (n.)

"brief, familiar proverb," 1540s, French adage (16c.), from Latin adagium "adage, proverb," apparently a collateral form of adagio, from ad "to" (see ad-) + *agi-, root of aio "I say," which is perhaps cognate with Armenian ar-ac "proverb," asem "to say." But some find this unlikely and suggest the second element might be related to agein "set in motion, drive, urge" (from PIE root *ag- "to drive, draw out or forth, move"). Related: Adagial.

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voiceless (adj.)
1530s, "unable to speak," from voice (n.) + -less. Meaning "having no say in affairs" is from 1630s; that of "unspoken, unuttered" is from 1816. In phonology, "unvoiced," from 1867. Related: Voicelessly; voicelessness.
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ineffable (adj.)
late 14c., "beyond expression, too great for words, inexpressible," from Old French ineffable (14c.) or directly from Latin ineffabilis "unutterable," from in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + effabilis "speakable," from effari "utter," from assimilated form of ex "out" (see ex-) + fari "to say, speak," from PIE root *bha- (2) "to speak, tell, say."

Meaning "that may not be spoken" is from 1590s. Plural noun ineffables was, for a time, a jocular euphemism for "trousers" (1823; see inexpressible). Related: Ineffably.
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indictive (adj.)
"proclaimed," 1650s, from Late Latin indictivus "proclaimed," from Latin indicere "to declare publicly, proclaim, announce," from in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + dicere "to speak, say, tell" (from PIE root *deik- "to show," also "pronounce solemnly").
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heterophemy (n.)

"the (unintentional) use of some other word or phrase in place of the one that was meant," 1875 (Grant White), from hetero- "other, different" + Greek phēmē "utterance" (from PIE root *bha- (2) "to speak, tell, say").

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Lutetian (adj.)
archaic or humorous way to say "Parisian," from the old Gallo-Roman name of the place, Lutetia Parisorum (see Paris), literally "Parisian swamps," from Latin lutum "mud, dirt, clay" (see lutose).
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Laertes 
king of Ithaca, father of Odysseus, his name is Greek, literally "gatherer of the people," or "urging the men," from laos "people" (see lay (adj.)) + eirein "to fasten together" (see series (n.)) or eirein "to speak, say" (see verb).
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