Etymology
Advertisement
grade (v.)

1650s, "to arrange in grades," from grade (n.). Meaning "to reduce (a road, etc.) to a level or degree of inclination" is from 1835. Meaning "assign a letter mark to" is from 1931. Related: Graded; grading.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
jughandle (n.)

also jug-handle, "handle of a jug," 1816, from jug (n.) + handle (n.). As a figure of this shape, from 1846. Sense of "tight curved road used for turns" is from 1957.

Related entries & more 
resurface (v.)

1857, "to provide (a road) with a fresh surface" (implied in resurfacing), from re- "back, again" + surface (v.). Meaning "to come to the surface again" (originally of submarines) is recorded by 1940. Related: Resurfaced.

Related entries & more 
overpass (n.)

"stretch of road that passes over another," 1929, American English, from over- + pass (v.). + Overpass has been a verb since late c. 1300, "to go over, go across."

Related entries & more 
drove (n.)

"a herd, especially of cattle," Old English draf "beasts driven in a body; road along which cattle are driven," originally "act of driving," from drifan "to drive" (see drive (v.)).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
side-way (n.)

also sideway, 1550s, "byway, path or way along the side of or diverging from a main road," from side (n.) + way (n.). Compare German Seitenweg. By 1738 as "sidewalk."

Related entries & more 
via (prep.)

1779, from Latin via "by way of," ablative form of via "way, road, path, highway, channel, course" (from PIE root *wegh- "to go, move, transport in a vehicle," which is also the source of English way (n.)).

Related entries & more 
Metro (n.)

Paris underground, 1904, from French abbreviation of Chemin de Fer Métropolitain "Metropolitan Railway" (see metropolitan (adj.)). French chemin de fer "railroad" is literally "iron road." Construction began in 1898.

Related entries & more 
shun (v.)

Middle English shunnen, "keep out of the way of, avoid (a person or place); refrain from, neglect (a practice or behavior)," from Old English scunian "run away from, avoid; abhor, loathe; seek safety by concealment," a word of uncertain origin; according to OED not found in other Germanic languages. Perhaps it is ultimately from PIE root *skeu- "to cover, to hide." Related: Shunned; shunning. A shun-pike (American English, by 1805 as a name of a road in New York) was a road constructed to avoid tolls.

Related entries & more 
headway (n.)

c. 1300, "main road, highway," from Old English heafodweg; see head (adj.) + way (n.). Sense of "motion forward" first attested 1748, short for ahead-way; ultimately nautical (compare leeway).

Related entries & more 

Page 5