Etymology
Advertisement
passageway (n.)

1640s, "a road, avenue, or path affording means of communication," American English, from passage + way (n.). As "a hall in a building," by 1846, American English.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Broadway 

common street name, c. 1300 as "a wide road or street," from broad (adj.) + way (n.); the allusive use for "New York theater district" is by 1881.

Related entries & more 
interchange (n.)

early 15c., "an exchange, act of exchanging reciprocally," from Old French entrechange, from entrechangier (see interchange (v.)). Meaning "alternate succession" is from 1550s. In reference to a type of road junction, 1944.

Related entries & more 
grade (v.)

1650s, "to arrange in grades," from grade (n.). Meaning "to reduce (a road, etc.) to a level or degree of inclination" is from 1835. Meaning "assign a letter mark to" is from 1931. Related: Graded; grading.

Related entries & more 
jughandle (n.)

also jug-handle, "handle of a jug," 1816, from jug (n.) + handle (n.). As a figure of this shape, from 1846. Sense of "tight curved road used for turns" is from 1957.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
overpass (n.)

"stretch of road that passes over another," 1929, American English, from over- + pass (v.). + Overpass has been a verb since late c. 1300, "to go over, go across."

Related entries & more 
drove (n.)

"a herd, especially of cattle," Old English draf "beasts driven in a body; road along which cattle are driven," originally "act of driving," from drifan "to drive" (see drive (v.)).

Related entries & more 
side-way (n.)

also sideway, 1550s, "byway, path or way along the side of or diverging from a main road," from side (n.) + way (n.). Compare German Seitenweg. By 1738 as "sidewalk."

Related entries & more 
resurface (v.)

1857, "to provide (a road) with a fresh surface" (implied in resurfacing), from re- "back, again" + surface (v.). Meaning "to come to the surface again" (originally of submarines) is recorded by 1940. Related: Resurfaced.

Related entries & more 
via (prep.)

1779, from Latin via "by way of," ablative form of via "way, road, path, highway, channel, course" (from PIE root *wegh- "to go, move, transport in a vehicle," which is also the source of English way (n.)).

Related entries & more 

Page 5