Etymology
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inequitable (adj.)

"unfair, unjust," 1660s, from in- (1) "not, opposite of" + equitable, which is ultimately from Latin aequus "even, just, equal." Related: Inequitably. The same formation in English has also meant "impassable on horses, unfit for riding over" (1620s), from Latin inequabilis, from equus "a horse" (see equine).

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outrider (n.)

mid-14c., "one who rides out or forth," especially a royal officer charged with collecting taxes, from out- + rider. The verb outride is from c. 1200 as "to ride forth, ride out" (utridan), from 1520s as "pass in riding, ride faster than." Related: Outrode; outridden.

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mount (n.2)

late 15c., "an act of mounting," from mount (v.) or from Old French monte. Sense of "that on which something is fixed for use and by which it is supported and held in place" is by 1739. The colloquial meaning "a horse for riding" is recorded by 1831 in sporting magazines.

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cleanliness (n.)

"state of being free from dirth or filth; habit of keeping clean," early 15c., from cleanly + -ness.

Cleanliness is indeed next to godliness. [John Wesley, Sermon "On Dress," c. 1791]
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jounce (v.)

"to jolt or shake," especially by rough riding, mid-15c., of unknown origin, perhaps a blend of jump and bounce. "Several words in -ounce, as bounce, flounce, pounce, trounce are of obscure history" [OED]. Related: Jounced; jouncing. The noun is 1787, from the verb.

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rodeo (n.)

"public entertainment show of horse-riding skill," 1914, from the earlier meaning "cattle round-up" (1834), from Spanish rodeo, "pen for cattle at a fair or market," literally "a going round," from rodear "go round, surround," related to rodare "revolve, roll," from Latin rotare "go around" (see rotary).

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meddling (n.)

mid-14c., "action of blending," verbal noun from meddle (v.). Meaning "act or habit of interfering in matters not of one's proper concern" is from late 14c. As a present-participle adjective, from 1520s. Related: Meddlingly.

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hack (v.2)

"illegally enter a computer system," by 1984; apparently a back-formation from hacker. Related: Hacked; hacking (1975 in this sense). Earlier verb senses were "to make commonplace" (1745), "make common by everyday use" (1590s), "use (a horse) for ordinary riding" (1560s), all from hack (n.2).

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nuthatch (n.)

type of small bird living in holes in trees, mid-14c. (early 13c. as a surname), note-hach, probably so called from its habit of breaking open and eating nuts; from nut (n.) + second element related to hack (v.) and hatchet.

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bus (n.)

1832, "public street carriage," originally a colloquial abbreviation of omnibus (q.v.). The modern English noun is nothing but a Latin dative plural ending. To miss the bus, in the figurative sense of "lose an opportunity," is from 1901, Australian English (OED has a figurative miss the omnibus from 1886). Busman's holiday "leisure time spent participating in what one does for a living" (1893) probably is a reference to London omnibus drivers riding the buses on their days off.

Sometimes a new play opens, and we have a wild yearning to see it. So we ask for a holiday, and spend the holiday seeing the other show. You know the London omnibus driver, when he takes a holiday, enjoys it by riding around on another omnibus. So we call it a 'busman's holiday' when we recuperate at another theater! [English actress Lily Elise in "The Girl Who Made Good," Cosmopolitan, December 1911]
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