Etymology
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unpack (v.)
late 15c., from un- (2) "reverse, opposite of" + pack (v.). Similar formation in Dutch ontpakken. Related: Unpacked; unpacking.
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unsex (v.)
"deprive of the qualities considered typical of one's gender," c. 1600, from un- (2) "reverse, opposite of" + sex (n.). Related: Unsexed; unsexing.
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unnerve (v.)
1620s, "to destroy the strength of," from un- (2) "reverse, opposite of" + nerve (v.). Meaning "to deprive of courage" is recorded from 1704. Related: Unnerved; unnerving.
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unsettle (v.)
1590s, "undo from a fixed position," from un- (2) "reverse, opposite of" + settle (v.). Of the mind, feelings, etc., attested from 1640s. Related: Unsettled; unsettling.
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discontent (v.)

"deprive of contentment, late 15c., from dis- "not, reverse of" + content (v.). Perhaps from Old French descontenter. Related: Discontented; discontentedly; discontentment; discontentedness.

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invert (v.)

"to turn (something) in an opposite direction; reverse the position, order, or sequence of," 1530s, from French invertir or directly from Latin invertere "turn upside down, turn about; upset, reverse, transpose," figuratively "pervert, corrupt, misrepresent," of words, "to use ironically," from in- "in, on" (from PIE root *en "in") + vertere "to turn" (from PIE root *wer- (2) "to turn, bend"). Related: Inverted; inverting; invertedly.

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disarticulate (v.)

1808, transitive, "undo the articulation of, separate joint from joint;" see dis- "reverse, opposite of" + articulate (v.). Intransitive sense of "become separated, lose articulation" is by 1830. Related: Disarticulated; disarticulating.

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disaggregate (v.)

"separate into component parts," 1803, from dis- "reverse, opposite of" + aggregate (v.) "bring together in a sum or mass." Related: Disaggregated; disaggregating; disaggregation.

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telegraphese (n.)
stripped-down style used to save expenses in writing telegraphs, 1885, from telegraph (n.) + -ese. Earlier in reference to the style of writing in the London "Daily Telegraph," which was rather the reverse.
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unlock (v.)
c. 1400, from un- (2) "reverse, opposite of" + lock (v.). Figurative sense is attested from 1530s. Old English had unlucan "to unlock, open." Related: Unlocked; unlocking.
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