Etymology
Advertisement
Constantinople 

from 330 C.E. to 1930 the name of what is now Istanbul and formerly was Byzantium, the city on the European side of the Bosphorus that served as the former capital of the Byzantine and Ottoman empires, from Greek Konstantinou polis "Constantine's city," named for Roman emperor Flavius Valerius Aurelius Constantinus (see Constantine), who transferred the Roman capital there.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
returnable (adj.)

early 15c., "meant to be returned" (of court documents); mid-15c., "likely to return" (of Christ, chance, etc.), from return (v.) + -able. Meaning "capable of being returned" is from 1540s.

Related entries & more 
pantarchy (n.)

"state in which rule is invested in the whole people," 1853, from combining form of Greek pantos "all" (see pan-) + -archy "rule." Related: Pantarchic (1872).

Related entries & more 
invest (v.)

late 14c., "to clothe in the official robes of an office," from Latin investire "to clothe in, cover, surround," from in "in, into" (from PIE root *en "in") + vestire "to dress, clothe," from PIE *wes- (2) "to clothe," extended form of root *eu- "to dress."

The meaning "use money to produce profit" is attested from 1610s in connection with the East Indies trade, and it is probably a borrowing of a special use of Italian investire (13c., from the same Latin root) via the notion of giving one's capital a new form. The figurative sense of "to clothe (with attributes)" is from c. 1600. The military meaning "to besiege, surround with hostile intent" also is from c. 1600. Related: Invested; investing.

Related entries & more 
decapitalize (v.)

"reduce from the rank or position of a capital city," 1870; see de- + capital (n.1) + -ize. As "to remove the financial capital from," by 1913, from capital (n.2). In reference to letters, "to change from upper case to lower case," by 1899. Related: Decapitalized; decapitalization.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Nanking 

city in China, literally "southern capital," from Chinese nan "south" + jing "capital."

Related entries & more 
repair (v.2)

c. 1300, repairen, "go (to a specified place), arrive, make one's way, betake oneself," from Old French repairer, repairier "to return, come back, to frequent, to return (to one's country)," earlier repadrer, from Late Latin repatriare "return to one's own country" (see repatriate). Related: Repaired; repairing; repairment.

Related entries & more 
cathected (adj.)

1927, in psychoanalysis jargon, "charged with mental energy, emotionally loaded," a back-formation from cathectic "invested with emotional energy" (1927), which is from Latinized form of Greek kathektikos, from kathexis "holding, retention" (see cathexis).

Related entries & more 
repassage (n.)

"passage back, return, liberty or right of return through another land," early 15c., from Old French repassage; see re- + passage.

Related entries & more 
reversion (n.)

late 14c., reversioun, a legal word used in reference to the return of an estate to the heirs of a grantor on the expiration of the grant, from Old French reversion and directly from Latin reversionem (nominative reversio) "act of turning back," noun of action from past-participle stem of revertere (see revert). From early 15c. as "a return to a place."

reversion has various senses, chiefly legal or biological .... It suffices to say that they all correspond to the verb revert, & not to the verb reverse, whose noun is reversal. [Fowler]
Related entries & more 

Page 5