Etymology
Advertisement
lull (n.)
1650s as the name of a soothing drink, from lull (v.). Meaning "temporary period of quiet or rest amid turmoil or activity" is from 1815.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
posada (n.)

"inn," 1763, from Spanish posada "home, lodging," from posar "to repose, rest, lodge," from Medieval Latin pausare "to halt, cease, pause; to lodge," from pausa (see pause (n.)).

Related entries & more 
electromagnetism (n.)

also electro-magnetism, "the collective term for phenomena which rest upon the relation between electric currents and magnetism," 1821; see electro- + magnetism.

Related entries & more 
bedtime (n.)
also bed-time, "the usual hour of going to rest," early 13c., from bed (n.) + time (n.). Bed-time story attested from 1867.
Related entries & more 
stagecoach (n.)
also stage-coach, 1650s, from stage (n.) in a sense of "division of a journey without stopping for rest" (c. 1600) + coach (n.).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Quietism (n.)

a form of mysticism which consists in abnegation of all exercise of the will and purely passive meditation on God and divine things, 1680s, from Italian quietismo, literally "passiveness," from quieto "calm, at rest," from Latin quietus "free; calm, resting" (from PIE root *kweie- "to rest, be quiet").

Originally in reference to the mysticism of Miguel Molinos (1640-1697), Spanish priest in Rome, whose "Guida spirituale" was published 1675 and condemned by the Inquisition in 1685. Related: Quietist; Quietistic.

Related entries & more 
breather (n.)
c. 1600, "a living creature, one who breathes," agent noun from breathe. Meaning "spell of exercise to stimulate breathing" is from 1836; that of "a rest to recover breath" is from 1882.
Related entries & more 
while (n.)
Old English hwile, accusative of hwil "a space of time," from Proto-Germanic *hwilo (source also of Old Saxon hwil, Old Frisian hwile, Old High German hwila, German Weile, Gothic hveila "space of time, while"), originally "rest" (compare Old Norse hvila "bed," hvild "rest"), from PIE *kwi-lo-, suffixed form of root *kweie- "to rest, be quiet." Notion of "period of rest" became in Germanic "period of time."

Now largely superseded by time except in formulaic constructions (such as all the while). Middle English sense of "short space of time spent in doing something" now only preserved in worthwhile and phrases such as worth (one's) while. As a conjunction, "during or in the time that; as long as" (late Old English), it represents Old English þa hwile þe, literally "the while that." Form whiles is recorded from early 13c.; whilst is from late 14c., with unetymological -st as in amongst, amidst. Service while-you-wait is attested from 1911.
Related entries & more 
acquiescent (adj.)
"disposed to yield, submissive," 1690s (implied in acquiescently), from Latin acquiescentem (nominative acquiescens), present participle of acquiescere "become quiet, remain at rest" (see acquiesce).
Related entries & more 
downtime (n.)

also down-time, 1952, "time when a machine or vehicle is out of service or otherwise unavailable;" from down (adj.) + time (n.). Of persons, "opportunity for rest and relaxation," by 1982.

Related entries & more 

Page 5