Etymology
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aerie (n.)

"eagle's nest," 1580s (attested in Anglo-Latin from early 13c.), from Old French aire "nest," Medieval Latin area "nest of a bird of prey" (12c.), perhaps from Latin area "level ground, garden bed" [Littré], though some doubt this [Klein]. Another theory connects it to atrium. Formerly spelled eyrie (1660s) on the mistaken assumption that it derived from Middle English ey "egg."

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backstage (n.)

also back-stage, "the area of a theater out of view of the audience," especially in the wings or dressing rooms, 1891; see back (adj.) + stage (n.).

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annulus (n.)

1560s in medical use, "ring-like area or space," from a Medieval Latin misspelling of Latin anulus "little ring, finger ring," a diminutive of anus "ring" (see anus).

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minefield (n.)

"area of land planted with explosive mines," 1877, from mine (n.2) + field (n.). Figurative meaning, "subject or situation fraught with unseen dangers," is by 1947.

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transpontine (adj.)

1844, in a London context in reference to the area south of the Thames, from Latin trans "across, beyond" (see trans-) + pontine, from stem of pons "bridge" (see pons).

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Ithaca 

western Greek Island, legendary home of Odysseus; the first element is perhaps Phoenician i "island;" the rest is unknown. Related: Ithacan.

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biomass (n.)

also bio-mass, "total weight of the organic substance or organisms in a given area," by 1969, from bio- + mass (n.1).

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requiescat (n.)

a wish or prayer for the repose of the dead, from the Latin phrase requiescat in pace (often abbreviated R.I.P.), literally "may he (or she) begin to rest in peace," with third person singular inceptive (or subjunctive) of requiescere "rest (after labor), be idle, repose," especially of the dead (see requiem). The phrase is "frequent in sepulchral inscriptions" [Century Dictionary].

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lie-down (n.)

period of rest reclining, 1840, from the verbal phrase (attested from c. 1200); see lie (v.2) + down (adv.).

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easeful (adj.)

"attended by or affording ease; promoting rest or comfort; quiet, peaceful, restful," late 14c., from ease (n.) + -ful.

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