Etymology
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nothingarian (n.)

"one who has no particular belief," especially in religious matters, 1789, from nothing + ending from unitarian, etc. Related: Nothingarianism.

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amortization (n.)
1670s, in reference to the alienation of lands given to religious orders, noun of action from amortize. Of debts, "extinction (especially by a sinking-fund)," from 1824.
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teleport (v.)

1940, in reference to religious miracles, from tele- + ending from transport (v.). In the science fiction sense by 1957. Related: Teleported; teleporter; teleporting.

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devotion (n.)

c. 1200, devocioun, "profound religious emotion, awe, reverence," from Old French devocion "devotion, piety" and directly from Latin devotionem (nominative devotio), noun of action from past-participle stem of devovere "dedicate by a vow, sacrifice oneself, promise solemnly," from de "down, away" (see de-) + vovere "to vow" (see vow (n.)). From late 14c. as "an act of religious worship, a religious exercise" (now usually devotions).

In ancient Latin, "act of consecrating by a vow," also "loyalty, fealty, allegiance;" in Church Latin, "devotion to God, piety." The application to secular situations came to English via Italian and French; sense of "act of setting apart or consecrating" is from c. 1500.

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talisman (n.)
1630s, "magical figure cut or engraved under certain observances," from French talisman, in part via Arabic tilsam (plural tilsaman), from Byzantine Greek telesma "talisman, religious rite, payment," earlier "consecration, ceremony," originally in ancient Greek "completion," from telein "perform (religious rites), pay (tax), fulfill," from telos "end, fulfillment, completion" (see telos). The Arabic word also was borrowed into Turkish, Persian, Hindi. Related: Talismanic; talismanical.
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paganism (n.)

"religious beliefs and practices of pagans," early 15c., paganisme, from Church Latin paganismus, from paganus (see pagan). Alternative paganity is from 1540s; pagandom is from 1739.

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come-outer (n.)

1850, U.S. slang, "one who abandons or dissents from an established creed or religious custom," from verbal phrase; see come + out (adv.).

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unction (n.)
"act of anointing as a religious rite," late 14c., from Latin unctionem (nominative unctio) "anointing," from unctus, past participle of ungere "to anoint" (see unguent).
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Bat Mitzvah 

1941, literally "daughter of command;" a Jewish girl who has reached age 12, the age of religious majority. Extended to the ceremony held on occasion of this.

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Manichaean 

also Manichean, 1550s (n.) "an adherent of the religious system taught by Manichaeus;" 1630s (adj.) "of or pertaining to the Manichaeans or their doctrines;" from Latin Manichaeus (see Manichaeism).

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