Etymology
Advertisement
compere (n.)

1738, from French compère "a godfather" in relation to the godmother or biological father, hence, as a friendly greeting, "friend, fellow," from Old French compere (13c.), from Medieval Latin compater (see compadre, and compare compeer, gossip). In vaudeville and other entertainment, "master of ceremonies, organizer of a show" (1914).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
paternity (n.)

mid-15c., paternite, "condition of being a father, relation of a father to a child or of God to mankind," from Old French paternité (12c.), from Late Latin paternitatem (nominative paternitas) "fatherly care, fatherhood," from Latin paternus "of a father," from pater (see father (n.)). Meaning "paternal origin, derivation from a father" is from 1868.

Related entries & more 
causation (n.)

1640s, "act of causing or producing," noun of action from cause (v.), or else from Medieval Latin causationem (nominative causatio) "action of causing" (in classical Latin "excuse, pretext"), from Latin causa "a cause, reason" (see cause (n.)). Meaning "relation of cause to effect" is from 1739.

Related entries & more 
Xenia 
city in Ohio, from Greek xenia "hospitality, rights of a guest, friendly relation with strangers," literally "state of a guest," from xenos "guest" (from PIE root *ghos-ti- "stranger, guest, host"). Founded 1803 and named by vote of a town meeting, on suggestion of the Rev. Robert Armstrong to imply friendliness and hospitality.
Related entries & more 
parataxis (n.)

"the placing of clauses one after another without connecting words to indicate their relation," 1838, from Greek parataxis "a placing side by side, a placing in line of battle," from stem of paratassein "to place side by side," from para- "beside" (see para- (1)) + tassein "to arrange" (see tactics). Related: Paratactic.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
proportionality (n.)

"character or state of being in proportion," 1560s, from French proportionalité (14c.) or directly from Medieval Latin proportionalitas, from proportio "comparative relation, analogy" (see proportion (n.)). The word was used in Middle English (proporcionalite) in mathematics in reference to geometrical ratios (mid-15c.).

Related entries & more 
objective (adj.)
1610s, originally in the philosophical sense of "considered in relation to its object" (opposite of subjective), formed on pattern of Medieval Latin objectivus, from objectum "object" (see object (n.)) + -ive. Meaning "impersonal, unbiased" is first found 1855, influenced by German objektiv. Related: Objectively.
Related entries & more 
fetching (adj.)
1580s, "crafty, scheming," present-participle adjective from fetch (v.), in one of its extended senses, here "bring or draw into a desired relation or condition." The sense of "alluring, fascinating" is by 1880, from the verb in the sense "allure, attract, fascinate" (c. 1600). Related: Fetchingly.
Related entries & more 
proximity (n.)

"nearness in place, time, or relation," late 15c., proxymyte [Caxton], from French proximité "nearness" (14c.), from Latin proximitatem (nominative proximitas) "nearness, vicinity," from proximus "nearest, next; most direct; adjoining," figuratively "latest, most recent; next, following; most faithful," superlative of prope "near" (see propinquity).

Related entries & more 
matrimony (n.)

c. 1300, matrimoine, "the married state, the relation of husband and wife, wedlock; the sacrament of marriage," from Old French matremoine "matrimony, marriage" and directly from Latin mātrimōnium "wedlock, marriage" (in plural "wives"), from mātrem (nominative māter) "mother" (see mother (n.1)) + -mōnium, suffix signifying "action, state, condition."

Related entries & more 

Page 5