Etymology
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post (v.4)

"to put up bail money," 1781, from one of the nouns post, but which one is uncertain. Related: Posted; posting.

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sentimentalist (n.)

"one guided by mere sentiment; one who lets sentiment predominate over reason," 1768, from sentimental + -ist.

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coat of arms (n.)

mid-14c., also simply coat (mid-14c.); originally a tunic embroidered or painted with heraldic armorial bearings (worn over armor, etc); see coat (n.) + arm (n.2) and compare Old French cote a armer. Sense transferred in Middle English to the heraldic arms themselves. Hence turncoat, one who put his coat on inside-out to hide the badge of his loyalty (1550s).

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oversell (v.)

also over-sell, 1879, "sell more than one can deliver," from over- + sell (v.). Figurative sense of "make unrealistic or excessive claims for" is by 1928.

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overachiever (n.)

also over-achiever, "one who achieves more than is expected,"  by 1946 in education publications, from over- + agent noun of achieve (v.). Related: Overachieve; overachieving; overachievement.

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addict (n.)

"one given over to some practice," 1909, first in reference to morphine, from addict (v.).

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dot (v.)

1740, "mark with a dot or dots," from dot (n.). Sense of "mark or diversify with small, detached objects" is by 1818. Sense of "put a dot over (the letter i)" is by 1833. Related: Dotted; dotting. Dotted line is by 1690s.

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overlap (n.)

"the lapping of one thing over another; thing or part which overlaps," 1813, from overlap (v.).

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translate (v.)
Origin and meaning of translate

early 14c., "to remove from one place to another," also "to turn from one language to another," from Old French translater and directly from Latin translatus "carried over," serving as past participle of transferre "to bring over, carry over" (see transfer), from trans "across, beyond" (see trans-) + lātus "borne, carried" (see oblate (n.)). Related: Translated; translating. A similar notion is behind the Old English word it replaced, awendan, from wendan "to turn, direct" (see wend).

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authoritarian (adj.)

"favoring imposed order over freedom," 1862, from authority + -an. Compare authoritative, which originally had this meaning to itself. The noun in the sense of "one advocating or practicing the principle of authority over individual freedom" is from 1859.

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