Etymology
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skipjack (n.)

1550s, "a pert shallow-brained fellow; a puppy, a whipper-snapper; a conceited fop or dandy" [OED], from skip (v.) + generic name jack (n.). Applied 1703 to tropical fishes with leaping tendencies. In reference to a kind of sailing boat used on Chesapeake Bay, attested from 1887.

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unloved (adj.)

late 14c., from un- (1) "not" + past participle of love (v.). A verb, unlove (with un- (2)) is attested from late 14c. Old English unlofod meant "unpraised."

He that can love unloved again,
Hath better store of love than brain
[Robert Ayton (1570-1638)]
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Erato 

muse who presided over lyric poetry, literally "the Lovely," from Greek Eratо̄, from  erastos "loved, beloved; lovely, charming," verbal adjective of eran "to love, to be in love with" (see Eros).

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amable (adj.)

early 15c., "friendly, courteous," from Old French amable "loving; worthy of love, amicable, pleasant," from Latin amabilem "lovely," from amare "to love" (see Amy). Related: Amably; amability.

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Cupid 

Roman god of passionate love, late 14c., from Latin Cupido, personification of cupido "desire, love, passion," from cupere "to desire" (see cupidity). Identified with Greek Eros. Cupid's bow as a shape, especially of lips, is from 1858.

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*leubh- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to care, desire, love."

It forms all or part of: belief; believe; furlough; leave (n.) "permission, liberty granted to do something;" leman; libido; lief; livelong; love; lovely; quodlibet.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit lubhyati "desires," lobhaya- "to make crazy;" Persian ahiftan "to be tangled, be hit down, be in love;" Latin lubet, later libet "pleases," libido, lubido "desire, longing; sensual passion, lust;" Old Church Slavonic l'ubu "dear, beloved," ljubiti, Russian ljubit' "to love;" Lithuanian liaupsė "song of praise;" Old English lufu "feeling of love; romantic sexual attraction," German Liebe "love," Gothic liufs "dear, beloved."

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waffle (v.)

1690s, "to yelp, bark," frequentative of provincial waff "to yelp, to bark like a puppy" (1610); possibly of imitative origin. Figurative sense of "talk foolishly" (c. 1700) led to that of "vacillate, equivocate" (1803), originally a Scottish and northern English usage. Late 17c. Scottish also had waff "act of waving," variant of waft, which might have influenced the sense. Related: Waffled; waffler; waffling.

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Kama Sutra (n.)

also Kamasutra, 1871, from Sanskrit Kama Sutra, name of the ancient treatise on love and sexual performance, from kama "love, desire" (from PIE *ka-mo-, suffixed form of root *ka- "to like, desire") + sutra "series of aphorisms" (see sutra).

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loving (adj.)

"affectionate," early 14c. (Old English had lufende "affectionate"), verbal noun from love (v.). Loving-cup, made for several to drink from, is attested from 1808. Loving-kindness was Coverdale's word to describe God's love (Psalms lxxxix.33).

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philophobia (n.)

"fear of love or emotional intimacy," by 1976, from philo- + -phobia.

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