Etymology
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airing (n.)
"action of exposing to air," c. 1600, verbal noun from air (v.). Meaning "display, public exposure" is from 1870.
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preview (n.)

"a foretaste," 1880, from preview (v.); specifically "a showing of a book, film, etc. before public release" by 1920.

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forum (n.)
mid-15c., "place of assembly in ancient Rome," from Latin forum "marketplace, open space, public place," apparently akin to foris, foras "out of doors, outside," from PIE root *dhwer- "door, doorway." Sense of "assembly, place for public discussion" first recorded 1680s.
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declamation (n.)

late 14c., declamacioun, "composition written to be declaimed," from Latin declamationem (nominative declamatio) "exercise in oratorical delivery; declamation;" in a bad sense, "loud, eager talking," noun of action from past-participle stem of declamare "to practice public speaking, to bluster," from de-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see de-) + clamare "to cry, shout" (from PIE root *kele- (2) "to shout"). Meaning "a public harangue or speech" is from 1520s; sense of "act of making rhetorical harangues in public" is from 1550s.

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proscription (n.)

late 14c., proscripcioun, "decree of condemnation, outlawry, sentence of exile, the dooming of a citizen to death as a public enemy and confiscation of his goods," from Latin proscriptionem (nominative proscriptio) "a public notice (of sale); proscription, outlawry, confiscation," noun of action from past-participle stem of proscribere "publish in writing" (see proscribe).

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receivership (n.)

late 15c., "office of a receiver of public revenues," from receiver + -ship. As "condition of being under control of a receiver," 1884.

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P.B.S. 

also PBS, abbreviation of Public Broadcasting Service, 1970, America English. It succeeded National Educational Television (NET).

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bulletin (n.)

1765, "authenticated official report concerning some event, issued for the information of the public," from French bulletin (16c.), modeled on Italian bulletino, diminutive of bulletta "document, voting slip," itself a diminutive of Latin bulla "round object" (see bull (n.2)) with equivalent of Old French -elet (see -let). For use of balls in voting, see ballot (n.).

The word was used earlier in English in the Italian form (mid-17c.). Popularized by their use in the Napoleonic Wars as the name for dispatches sent from the front and meant for the home public (which led to the proverbial expression as false as a bulletin). Broadcast news sense of "any brief, notice or public announcement of news" is from 1925. Bulletin board "public board on which news and notices are posted" is from 1831; computer sense is from 1979.

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koan (n.)
Zen paradox meant to stimulate the mind, 1918, from Japanese ko "public" + an "matter for thought."
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impressment (n.)
1796, "act of impressing into public service or use," from impress (v.2) + -ment.
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