Etymology
Advertisement
rehearsal (n.)

late 14c., rehersaille, "restatement, repetition of the words of another; account, narration," from rehearse + -al (2), or from Old French rehearsal "a repeating." Sense in theater and music, "act or process of studying by practice or preparatory exercise, a meeting of musical or dramatic performers for practice and study together" is from 1570s. A play being in rehearsal is from 1709. Pre-wedding rehearsal dinner attested by 1953.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
robbery (n.)

c. 1200, robberie, "the act, practice, or occupation of stealing or plundering," from Old French roberie "robbery, theft," from rober "to rob" (see rob).

Related entries & more 
shanghai (v.)
"to drug a man unconscious and ship him as a sailor," 1854, American English, from the practice of kidnapping to fill the crews of ships making extended voyages, such as to the Chinese seaport of Shanghai.
Related entries & more 
symbolism (n.)
1650s, "practice of representing things with symbols," from symbol + -ism. Applied to the arts by 1866; attested from 1892 as a movement in French literature, from French symbolisme (see symbolist).
Related entries & more 
corporatism (n.)

"principal or practice of corporate organization," 1880, from corporate + -ism. Used over the years in various senses of corporate; in 1920s-30s often with reference to fascist collectivism.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
cosmetology (n.)

"art or practice of beauty culture," 1855, from French cosmétologie, from Latinized form of Greek kosmetos "well-ordered," from kosmein "to arrange, adorn," from kosmos "order; ornament" (see cosmos) + -ology.

Related entries & more 
devotee (n.)

"one who is self-dedicated to a cause or practice," 1640s, from devote, with a French suffix, perhaps on model of assignee. Earlier in this sense was devote (1620s).

Related entries & more 
brutalism (n.)
1803, "the practice or exercise of brutality," from brutal + -ism. In the arts, 1953 in reference to a style characterized by deliberate crudity and exposed structure. Brutalist is from 1934 in literature.
Related entries & more 
one-upsmanship (n.)

"act or practice of being 'one up,'" 1952, from noun phrase one up "scoring one more point than one's opponent" (1919) + ending from sportsmanship, etc.

Related entries & more 
charlatanism (n.)

"methods of a charlatan," 1804, from French charlatanisme; see charlatan + -ism. OED describes synonym charlatanry (1630s) as "More contemptuous ... and referring more to actual practice."

Related entries & more 

Page 5