Etymology
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rehearsal (n.)

late 14c., rehersaille, "restatement, repetition of the words of another; account, narration," from rehearse + -al (2), or from Old French rehearsal "a repeating." Sense in theater and music, "act or process of studying by practice or preparatory exercise, a meeting of musical or dramatic performers for practice and study together" is from 1570s. A play being in rehearsal is from 1709. Pre-wedding rehearsal dinner attested by 1953.

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commercialism (n.)

1849, "principles and practice of commerce," from commercial (adj.) + -ism. By 1889 as "predominance of commercial pursuits in a place or community."

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pomiculture (n.)

"the art or practice of fruit-growing," by 1852, probably from French pomiculture (1830), from Latin pomus "fruit" (see Pomona); also see culture (n.).

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symbolism (n.)

1650s, "practice of representing things with symbols," from symbol + -ism. Applied to the arts by 1866; attested from 1892 as a movement in French literature, from French symbolisme (see symbolist).

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corporatism (n.)

"principal or practice of corporate organization," 1880, from corporate + -ism. Used over the years in various senses of corporate; in 1920s-30s often with reference to fascist collectivism.

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cosmetology (n.)

"art or practice of beauty culture," 1855, from French cosmétologie, from Latinized form of Greek kosmetos "well-ordered," from kosmein "to arrange, adorn," from kosmos "order; ornament" (see cosmos) + -ology.

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one-upsmanship (n.)

"act or practice of being 'one up,'" 1952, from noun phrase one up "scoring one more point than one's opponent" (1919) + ending from sportsmanship, etc.

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robbery (n.)

c. 1200, robberie, "the act, practice, or occupation of stealing or plundering," from Old French roberie "robbery, theft," from rober "to rob" (see rob).

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sight-reading (n.)

"act or practice of reading a piece of music at first sight," as a test of proficiency, 1864, see sight + read (v.). Related: Sight-read (v.).

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farming (n.)

1590s, "action of farming out, practice of letting or leasing taxes, etc., for collection," verbal noun from farm (v.). Meaning "business of cultivating land, husbandry" is attested by 1733.

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