Etymology
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latticework (n.)
also lattice-work, late 15c., from lattice + work (n.).
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roadwork (n.)
also road-work, 1765, "work done in making and repairing roads;" 1903 as "exercise done on roads;" from road (n.) + work (n.).
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brickwork (n.)
"building work done in brick," 1570s, from brick (n.) + work (n.).
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artwork (n.)

also art-work, "artistic work; paintings, drawings, etc.," 1847, from art (n.) + work (n.). Perhaps modeled on German Kunstwerk.

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workload (n.)
also work-load, 1939, from work (n.) + load (n.).
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beadwork (n.)
also bead-work, 1762, from bead (n.) + work (n.).
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piecework (n.)

also piece-work, "work done and paid for by measure or quantity" in contradistinction to work done and paid for by measure of time, 1540s, from piece (n.1) + work (n.) in the sense of "a distinct job or operation taken separately." Related: Pieceworker.

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line-up (n.)
also lineup, from the verbal phrase line up (1889 as "form a line;" 1902 as "make into a line"); see line (v.2) + up (adv.). As a noun, the baseball version (1889) is older than the police version (1907).
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handiwork (n.)
late 12c., from Old English handgeweorc "work of the hand, creation," from hand (n.) + geweorc, collective form of weorc "work" (see work (n.)). Old English collective prefix ge- regularly reduces to i- in Middle English, and the word probably came to be felt as handy + work.
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shamus (n.)

"police officer, detective," 1920, apparently first in "The Shamus," a detective story published that year by Harry J. Loose (1880-1943), a Chicago police detective and crime writer; the book was marketed as "a true tale of thiefdom and an expose of the real system in crime." The word is said to be probably from Yiddish shames, literally "sexton of a synagogue" (according to Israel Zangwill "a potent personage only next in influence to the President"), from Hebrew shamash "servant." Probably influenced by Celtic Seamus "James," as a typical name for an Irish cop.

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