Etymology
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herbivorous (adj.)

"plant-eating," 1660s, from Modern Latin herbivorus, from Latin herba "a plant" (see herb) + vorare "devour, swallow" (from PIE root *gwora- "food, devouring").

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toady (n.)

"servile parasite," 1826, apparently shortened from toad-eater "fawning flatterer" (1742), originally (1620s) "the assistant of a charlatan," who ate a toad (believed to be poisonous) to enable his master to display his skill in expelling the poison. The verb is recorded from 1827. Related: Toadied; toadying.

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beet-root (n.)

"the root of the beet plant," 1570s, from beet (n.) + root (n.).

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deleterious (adj.)

1640s, "noxious, poisonous," from Medieval Latin deleterius, from Greek dēlētērios "noxious," from dēlētēr "destroyer," from dēlēisthai "to hurt, injure," of which Beekes writes, "the verb is probably non-IE, i.e. Pre-Greek." From 1823 as "mentally or morally hurtful or injurious." Related: Deleteriously; deleteriousness.

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arnica (n.)

plant genus of the borage family, native to central Europe, 1753, Modern Latin, a name of unknown origin. Klein suggests Arabic arnabiyah, a name of a type of plant, as the ultimate source. Century Dictionary suggests "perhaps a perversion of ptarmica."

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alkanet (n.)

mid-14c., "the plant alkanet" or its root (which yields a red dye material and is used as a styptic), from Medieval Latin, from a diminutive of alcanna, from Arabic al-hinna (see henna). As the name of the plant itself, from 1560s.

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phyto- 

word-forming element meaning "plant," from Greek phyton "plant," literally "that which has grown," from phyein "to bring forth, make grow," from PIE root *bheue- "to be, exist, grow."

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mephitic (adj.)

1620s, "of poisonous smell, foul, noxious," from Late Latin mephiticus, from Latin mephitis, mefitis "noxious vapor, a pestilential exhalation, especially from the earth" (also personified as a goddess believed to have the power to avert it), an Italic word of uncertain origin. English use of mephitis is attested from 1706.

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Plantagenet 

house or family which reigned in England from 1154 to 1485, the name apparently is literally "broom-plant" (French plante genêt), from Latin genista "broom plant."

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bromide (n.)

compound of bromine and another metal or radical, 1836, from bromine, the pungent, poisonous element, + -ide. Used medicinally as a sedative; figurative sense of "dull, conventional person or trite saying" popularized by U.S. humorist Frank Gelett Burgess in his book "Are You a Bromide?" (1906). Related: Bromidic.

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