Etymology
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albumin (n.)
chemical substance named for the Latin word for "the whites of eggs," where it occurs naturally, 1869; see albumen.
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soap-dish (n.)
1835 as a dish for a bar of soap; 1814 as a holder for shaving-soap, from soap (n.) + dish (n.).
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gasometer (n.)
1790, from gas (n.1) + -meter. Originally an instrument for measuring gases; as this also involves collecting and storing them, it came also to be used for "a storehouse for gas." Related: Gasometric; gasometry.
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mercenary (adj.)

"working or acting for reward, serving only for gain," hence "resulting from sordid motives, ready to accept dishonorable gain," 1530s, from mercenary (n.), or in part from Latin mercenarius "hired, paid, serving for pay."

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thresher (n.)

late 14c., agent noun from thresh. The thresher shark (c. 1600) so called for its long upper "tail," which resembles a threshing tool. The Greek for it was alōpēx, literally "fox," also for the tail.

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request (n.)

mid-14c., requeste, "act of asking for a favor, service, etc.; expression of desire for something to be granted or done," from Old French requeste (Modern French requête) "a request," from Vulgar Latin *requaesita, from Latin requisita (res) "(a thing) asked for," from fem. of requisitus "requested, demanded," past participle of requirere "seek to know, ask, ask for" (see require).

From late 14c. as "that which one asks for." By 1928 as "a letter, telephone call, etc., asking for a particular song to be played on a radio program, often accompanied by a personal message or dedication."

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sweet-grass (n.)
1570s, from sweet (adj.) + grass (n.). Perhaps so called for the fondness of cattle for it.
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VW (n.)
1958, short for Volkswagen, which is German for "people's car" (see folk (n.) + wagon).
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fish-food (n.)

 1863, "food for (pet or hobby) fish;" 1860, "fish as food for humans;" from fish (n.) + food

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tech (n.)
1906 as short for technical college (or institute, etc.), American English; 1942 as short for technician.
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