Etymology
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steppe (n.)
vast treeless plain of southeastern Europe and of Asia, 1670s, from German steppe and directly from Russian step', of unknown origin. Introduced in Western Europe by von Humboldt.
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homespun (adj.)
1590s, "spun at home," from home (n.) + spun. Figurative sense of "plain, homely" is from c. 1600. As a noun, "homemade cloth or clothing," from c. 1600.
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bloodless (adj.)
Old English blodleas, "drained of blood;" see blood (n.) + -less. The figurative sense in Middle English was "powerless, without spirit or energy." Meaning "free from bloodshed" is from c. 1600; that of "cold-hearted" is from 1881. Related: Bloodlessly.
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no-frills (adj.)

1957, from no + frills. The expression no thrills meaning "without extra flourishes or ornamentation" is in use from 1870s; the original notion probably is of plain clothing.

Man with no frills (American) a plain person, a man without culture or refinement. An amiable term to express a vulgar fellow. [Albert Barrère and Charles G. Leland, "A Dictionary of Slang, Jargon & Cant," Ballantyne Press, 1890]
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tundra (n.)
an Arctic steppe, 1841, from Russian tundra, from Lappish (Finno-Ugric) tundar, said to mean "elevated wasteland, high-topped hill," or "a marshy plain."
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redingote (n.)

"double-breasted outer coat with long plain skirts," also a similar garment for women, 1793, from French redingote (1725), representing a French pronunciation of English riding coat (c. 1500).

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flatly (adv.)
early 15c. in a literal sense, from flat (adj.) + -ly (2). Meaning "in a plain manner" is from 1560s; sense of "in a dull manner" is from 1640s.
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plainly (adv.)

late 14c., "frankly, candidly; without a doubt, truly; in a clear and distinct manner; simply, straightforwardly," from plain (adj.) + -ly (2). Meaning "simply, frugally" is from 1560s.

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forthright (adj.)

Old English forðriht "direct, plain;" see forth + -right. Compare downright. Related: Forthrightly; forthrightness. As an adverb, from Old English forðrihte "straightway, at once; plainly."

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slight (v.)
c. 1300, "make plain or smooth," from slight (adj.) Meaning "treat with indifference" (1590s) is from the adjective in sense of "having little worth." Related: Slighted; slighting.
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