Etymology
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darn (v.)

"to mend (fabric) by interweaving yarn or thread to fill a rent or hole," c. 1600, of unknown origin. Perhaps from French darner "mend," from darne "a piece, a slice," from Breton darn "piece, fragment, part." Alternative etymology is from obsolete dern "secret, hidden." Related: Darned; darning.

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thrombus (n.)

1690s, Modern Latin, from Greek thrombos "lump, piece, clot of blood, curd of milk," a word of uncertain etymology.

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fane (n.)

"weathercock," late 14c., from Old English fana, fona "flag, banner," from Proto-Germanic *fanan- (source also of Old Frisian fana, Gothic fana "piece of cloth," Old High German fano, German Fahne "flag, standard"); possibly cognate with Latin pannus "piece of cloth" (see pane).

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driblet (n.)

also dribblet, "small piece or part, an inconsiderable part of a whole," 1590s, diminutive of drib (n.) with -let.

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videocassette (n.)
1970, from video + cassette. Videocassette recorder is from 1971, usually VCR (also 1971), now a period piece.
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fag (n.1)
British slang for "cigarette" (originally, especially, the butt of a smoked cigarette), 1888, probably from fag "loose piece, last remnant of cloth" (late 14c., as in fag-end "extreme end, loose piece," 1610s), which perhaps is related to fag (v.), which could make it a variant of flag (v.).
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gastro-enterology (n.)
also gastroenterology, 1904, from gastro- + enterology, from Greek enteron "an intestine, piece of gut" (see enteric). Related: Gastroenterologist.
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match-head (n.)

"piece of some chemical composition with which a match is tipped," 1860, from match (n.1) + head (n.).

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flag (n.2)

"flat stone for paving," c. 1600, ultimately from Old Norse flaga "stone slab," from Proto-Germanic *flago- (from extended form of PIE root *plak- (1) "to be flat"). Earlier in English as "piece cut from turf or sod" (mid-15c.), from Old Norse flag "spot where a piece of turf has been cut out," from flaga.

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storage (n.)
1610s, "space for storing," from store (v.) + -age. Storage unit as a household piece attested from 1951.
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