Etymology
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Sistine (adj.)

"pertaining to (a) Pope Sixtus," from Italian sistino, from Sixtus, the name of five popes, from Latin sextus "sixth" (see Sextus). The "chapel" (called Sistine in English from 1771) is named for Sixtus IV (Francesco della Rovere), pope 1471-84, who had it built. The painting by Raphael known as the Sistine Madonna is so called because it also shows Sixtus II, a 3c. martyr and saint; it is better known now for the two cherubs at the bottom of the picture who by 1900 were well-known in isolation from the rest of the picture in engravings, etc.

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story (n.2)

"floor of a building," c. 1400, from Anglo-Latin historia "floor of a building" (c. 1200), also "picture," from Latin historia (see history). "Perhaps so called because the front of buildings in the Middle Ages often were decorated with rows of painted windows" [Barnhart].

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keeping (n.)

"care, custody, charge," c. 1300, verbal noun from keep (v.). Phrase in keeping with "in harmony or agreement with" (1806) is from use of keeping in the jargon of painting to refer to a pleasing harmony of the elements of a picture (1715).

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telegenic (adj.)

1939, from television + ending from photogenic.

Judith Barrett, pretty and blonde actress, is the first Telegenic Girl to go on record. In other words, she is the perfect type of beauty for television. ... She is slated for the first television motion picture. [Baltimore Sun, Oct. 16, 1939]
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daguerreotype (n.)

"picture taken with an early photographic process involving silver plates, iodine, and vapor of mercury," 1839, from French daguerreotype, coined from the name of the inventor, Louis J.M. Daguerre (1789-1851) + -type (see type (n.)). As a verb from 1839. Related: Daguerreotypist.

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background (n.)

"the ground or situation to the rear of what is in front or most engaging of the attention," 1670s, from back (adj.) + ground (n.); the original use was theatrical; the word was applied to painting ("part of a picture representing what is furthest from the spectator") by 1752. The figurative sense is attested by 1854.

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studio (n.)

1819, "work-room of a sculptor or painter," usually one with windows to admit light from the sky, from Italian studio "room for study," from Latin studium (see study (v.)). Motion picture sense first recorded 1911; radio broadcasting sense 1922; television sense 1938. Studio apartment first recorded 1903.

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splice (v.)

1520s, originally a sailors' word, from Middle Dutch splissen "to splice" (Dutch splitsen), from Proto-Germanic *spli-, from PIE root *(s)plei- "to split, splice" (see flint). The Dutch word was borrowed in French as épisser. Used of motion picture film from 1912; of DNA from 1975. Related: Spliced; splicing; splicer.

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portrait (n.)

1560s, "a figure, drawn or painted," a back formation from portraiture or directly from French portrait, from Old French portret (13c.), noun use of past participle of portraire "to paint, depict" (see portray). Especially a picture or representation of the head and face of a person drawn from life. Related: Portraitist.

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retake (v.)

mid-15c., "to take back," from re- "back, again" + take (v.). Meaning "to recapture" is recorded from 1640s; sense of "to record a second time" is attested from 1962. Related: Retook; retaking; retaken. As a noun, "action of filming a (motion picture) scene again," it is from 1918; figurative use from 1937.

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