Etymology
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domain (n.)

c. 1600, "territory over which dominion is exerted," from French domaine "domain, estate," from Medieval Latin domanium "domain, estate," from Latin dominium "property, dominion," from dominus "lord, master, owner," from domus "house" (from PIE root *dem- "house, household"). A later borrowing from French of the word which became demesne.

Sense of "dominion, province of action" is from 1727. Meaning "range or limits of any department of knowledge or sphere of action" is from 1764. Internet domain name is attested by 1985. Via the notion of "ownership of land" comes legal eminent domain "ultimate or supreme lordship over all property in the state" is attested from 1738.

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microcomputer (n.)

"small computer built around a single microprocessor," 1971, from micro- + computer. A name for what later generally would be called a personal or home computer.

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disposal (n.)

1620s, "power to make use of, right to dispose of or control;" see dispose + -al (2). Meaning "a disposing" (of a daughter by marriage, of money by a will, of an estate by sale, etc.) is from 1650s; of waste material, from c. 1960, originally in medical use.

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personally (adv.)

late 14c., "in person; by one's own actions," from personal + -ly (2). Sense of "with respect to an individual" is from late 15c. Meaning "as far as I'm concerned" is from 1849.

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transgender (adj.)

also trans-gender, by 1974 in reference to persons whose sense of personal identity does not correspond with their anatomical sex, from trans- + gender (n.). Related: Transgendered.

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fixer (n.)

1849, of chemicals, etc.; 1885 as a person who "makes things right;" agent noun from fix (v.). Fixer-upper is from 1967 as "that which repairs other things" (in an advertisement for a glue); by 1976 as a real-estate euphemism for "property that needs a lot of work."

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Levittown 

used figuratively for "generic suburban tract housing," American English, from the vast planned real estate developments built by the firm Levitt & Sons Inc., the first on Long Island, 1946-51 (more than 17,000 homes), the second north of Philadelphia (1951-55).

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moke (n.)

slang word meaning "dolt," 1855, originally (16c.) "donkey;" of unknown origin, perhaps originally a personal name. In U.S., "black person," from 1856, perhaps a different word.

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fundament (n.)

late 13c., "foundation, base; buttocks, anus," from Old French fondement "foundation, bottom; land, estate; anus" (12c.), from Latin fundamentum "a foundation, ground-work; support; beginning," from fundare "to found" (see bottom (n.)). So called because it is where one sits.

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tokay (n.)

1710, rich sweet wine from the region of Tokay (Hungarian Tokaj) a town in Hungary. The name is perhaps Slavic, from tok "current," or Hungarian, from a Turkic personal name.

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