Etymology
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supposed (adj.)
"believed or thought to exist," 1580s, past-participle adjective from suppose (v.); often with the -e- pronounced, to distinguish it from the passive past tense supposed, now common in the sense of "to have a duty or obligation" (1859).
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hapax legomenon (n.)
(plural legomena), "word occurring only once," Greek, literally "once said," from hapax "once only" + legomenon, neuter passive present participle of legein "to say," from PIE root *leg- (1) "to collect, gather," with derivatives meaning "to speak (to 'pick out words')."
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certorari (n.)

"writ from superior to inferior courts seeking the records of a case," legal Latin, "to be certified, to be informed or shown," a word figuring in the opening phrase of such writs; passive present infinitive of certorare "to certify, inform," from certior, comparative of certus "sure" (see certain).

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hight (v.)

"named, called" (archaic), from levelled past participle of Middle English highte, from Old English hatte "I am called" (passive of hatan "to call, name, command") merged with heht "called," active past tense of the same verb. Hatte was the only survival in Old English of the old Germanic synthetic passive tense. Proto-Germanic *haitanan "to call, summon," also is the source of Old Norse heita, Dutch heten, German heißen, Gothic haitan "to call, be called, command," and is perhaps from an extended form of PIE root *keie- "to set in motion," but Boutkan finds it to be of uncertain origin.

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passivity (n.)

"passiveness," 1650s, from passive + -ity. Middle English had passion in a sense of "fact or condition of being acted upon" (c. 1400), also passabilite "capacity for being acted upon or suffering" (mid-14c.; see passible).

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phonic (adj.)

"of or pertaining to sound, acoustic," 1793, from Greek phōnē "sound, voice" (from PIE root *bha- (2) "to speak, tell, say") + -ic.

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endue (v.)
also indue, c. 1400, "invest (with) some gift, quality, or power" (usually passive), from Old French enduire, induire "lead, drive, initiate, indoctrinate" (12c.) and directly from Latin inducere "to lead" (see induce). Related: Endued.
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phonetic (adj.)

1803, "representing vocal sounds," from Modern Latin phoneticus (Zoega, 1797), from Greek phōnētikos "vocal," from phōnētos "to be spoken, utterable," verbal adjective of phōnein "to speak clearly, utter," from phōnē "sound, voice," from PIE root *bha- (2) "to speak, tell, say" (see fame (n.)). Meaning "relating or pertaining to the human voice as used in speech" is by 1861. Related: Phonetical.

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monophonic (adj.)

of recordings, broadcasts, etc., "not stereo, having only one output signal," 1958, coined to be an opposite of stereophonic; from mono- "single" + -phonic, from Greek phōnē "sound, voice," from PIE root *bha- (2) "to speak, tell, say." It was used earlier in music, "pertaining to a style of composition in which one voice-part predominates over the others" (opposed to polyphonic), by 1885.

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aphonic (adj.)

"having no sound," 1827, with -ic + Greek aphonos "voiceless," from a- "not, without" (see a- (3)) + phōnē "voice" (from PIE root *bha- (2) "to speak, tell, say").

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