Etymology
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vicissitude (n.)

"a passing from one state to another," whether regular or not, 1560s, from French vicissitude (14c.), from Latin vicissitudinem (nominative vicissitudo) "change, interchange, alternation," from vicissim (adv.) "changeably, on the other hand, by turns, in turn," from vicis "a turn, change" (from PIE root *weik- (2) "to bend, to wind"). Related: Vicissitudes.

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screen (v.)

"to shield from punishment, protect from inconvenience or danger; to conceal," late 15c., from screen (n.). Meaning "sift by passing through a screen" is by 1660s; the meaning "examine systematically for suitability" is from 1943, a word from World War II. The sense of "release a movie" is from 1915. The U.S. sporting sense is by 1922. Related: Screened; screening.

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intercept (v.)
c. 1400, "to cut off" (a line), "prevent" (the spread of a disease), from Latin interceptus, past participle of intercipere "take or seize between, to seize in passing," from inter "between" (see inter-) + -cipere, combining form of capere "to take, catch," from PIE root *kap- "to grasp." Related: Intercepted; intercepting.
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infiltration (n.)
"action or process of infiltrating," in physics, 1796, noun of action from infiltrate. Figurative sense of "a passing into" (anything immaterial) is from 1840; military sense of "stealthy penetration of enemy lines" dates from 1930. The same word had been used earlier in a medical sense of "a knitting together" (early 15c.), from Medieval Latin infiltratio.
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overdraft (n.)

by 1841 in the banking sense "action of overdrawing an account;" by 1891 as "amount by which a draft exceeds the sum against which it is drawn;" from over- + draft (n.). Also, in ovens, furnaces, etc., "a draft of air passing over, but not through, the ignited fuel," by 1884.

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dumb-waiter (n.)

also dumbwaiter, 1749, "a framework with shelves between a kitchen and a dining-room for conveying foods, etc.," from dumb (adj.) + waiter; so called because it serves as a waiter but is silent. As a movable platform for passing dishes, etc., up and down from one room (especially a basement kitchen) to another, from 1847.

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transitive (adj.)
"taking a direct object" (of verbs), 1570s (implied in transitively), from Late Latin transitivus (Priscian) "transitive," literally "passing over (to another person)," from transire "cross over, go over, pass over, hasten over, pass away," from trans "across, beyond" (see trans-) + ire "to go" (from PIE root *ei- "to go"). Related: Transitively.
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Herefordshire 
Old English Herefordscir, from Hereford (958), literally "ford suitable for the passage of an army" (see harry (v.) + ford (n.). Probably so-called in reference to the Roman road passing over the Wye River. Herford in Germany has the same etymology. As the name for a type of cattle, first bred there, it is attested from 1789.
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graze (v.2)
"to touch lightly in passing," c. 1600, perhaps a transferred sense from graze (v.1) via a notion of cropping grass right down to the ground (compare German grasen "to feed on grass," used in military sense in reference to cannonballs that rebound off the ground). Related: Grazed; grazing. As a noun from 1690s, "an act of grazing."
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paralipsis (n.)

"pretended or suggested omission for rhetorical effect," 1580s, from Greek paraleipsis "passing by omission," from paraleipein "to leave on one side, pass over, leave untold," from para- "beside" (see para- (1)) + leipein "to leave" (from PIE root *leikw- "to leave"). As in passages that open with "not to mention," "to say nothing of," etc.

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