Etymology
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buy-out (n.)

also buy-out, "the purchasing of a controlling share in a company," 1961, from verbal phrase buy out "purchase (someone's) estate and turn him out of it," 1640s, from buy (v.) + out (adv.).

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rain-out (n.)

also rain out, rainout, "cancellation or interruption of an outdoor event due to rain," 1947, from the verbal phrase; see rain (v.) + out (adv.). Of baseball games, to be rained out "cancelled because of rain" is attested from 1928.

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wash-out (n.)

also washout, 1877, "act of washing out" (a drain, etc.), from verbal phrase; see wash (v.) + out (adv.). From 1873 as "excavation of a roadbed, etc., by erosion" is from 1873. Meaning "a disappointing failure" is from 1902, from verbal phrase wash out "obliterate, cancel" (something written in ink), attested from 1570s. Hence also the colloquial sense of "to call off (an event) due to bad weather, etc." (1917). Of colored material, washed-out "faded" is from 1837.

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stake-out (n.)

"act of surveillance (of a place) to detect criminal activity or find a wanted person," by 1942, American English, from the verbal phrase (1942), from stake (v.2) + out (adv.).

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way-out (adj.)

1868, "far off," from way (adv.), short for away, + out. Sense of "original, bold," is jazz slang from 1940s, probably suggesting "far off" from what is conventional or expected.

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fade-out (n.)

1918, from verbal phrase, from fade (v.) + out (adv.).

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out-herod (v.)

"exceed in any excess of evil," from Shakespeare's it out-Herods Herod in Hamlet's instruction to the players in "Hamlet" Act III, Scene II. Shakespeare used the same construction elsewhere ("All's Well that Ends Well" has out-villain'd villany). The phrase reflects the image of Herod as stock braggart and bully in old religious drama. The form of the phrase was widely imitated 19c. and extended to any excessive behavior.

Oh, it offends me to the soul to hear a robustious periwig-pated fellow tear a passion to tatters, to very rags, to split the ears of the groundlings, who for the most part are capable of nothing but inexplicable dumb-shows and noise: I would have such a fellow whipped for o'erdoing Termagant; it out-herods Herod: pray you, avoid it. ["Hamlet"]
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passe (adj.)

"out of use, faded, past the heyday of life," 1775, from French passé (fem. passée) "past, faded," past participle of passer "to pass," from Vulgar Latin *passare "to step, walk, pass," from Latin passus "step, pace" (from PIE root *pete- "to spread"). Originally of a woman past the period of greatest beauty.

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export (v.)

by 1610s, "carrying out of a place;" perhaps from late 15c., from Latin exportare "to carry out, bring out; send away, export," from ex "out, away" (see ex-) + portare "to carry," from PIE root *per- (2) "to lead, pass over." The sense of "send out (commodities) from one country to another" is first recorded in English 1660s. Related: Exported; exporting; exporter.

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outrider (n.)

mid-14c., "one who rides out or forth," especially a royal officer charged with collecting taxes, from out- + rider. The verb outride is from c. 1200 as "to ride forth, ride out" (utridan), from 1520s as "pass in riding, ride faster than." Related: Outrode; outridden.

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