Etymology
Advertisement
padding (n.)

"material used in stuffing, stuffing used to keep a garment in the desired shape," 1828, verbal noun from pad (v.2).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
paddle (v.2)

"to beat with a paddle, spank with the open hand or with some flat object," by 1856, from paddle (n.). Related: Paddled; paddling.

Related entries & more 
paddle (n.)

c. 1400, padell "small, long-handled spade used to remove earth adhering to a plow," probably from Medieval Latin padela, a word of uncertain origin, perhaps from Latin patella "small pan, little dish, plate," diminutive of patina (see pan (n.)). Meaning "short oar with a wide blade" (or two, one at each end) is from 1620s. As an instrument used for beating clothes (and slaves, and schoolboys), it is recorded from 1828, American English. As "fin-like forelimb of a sea creature," by 1835. Paddle-ball is attested from 1935.

Related entries & more 
paddle (v.1)

"to dabble, wade in water," 1520s, probably cognate with Low German paddeln "tramp about," frequentative of padjen "to tramp, to run in short steps," from the source of  pad (v.). Related: Paddled; paddling. Meaning "to move in water by means of paddles" is a different word (see paddle (v.3)).

Related entries & more 
paddle (v.3)

"to move in water by means of paddles," 1670s, from paddle (n.). To paddle one's (own) canoe "do for oneself make one's way by one's own exertions," is from 1828, American English.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
paddle-wheel (n.)

also paddlewheel, "wheel provided with boards or floats around its circumference, for use in moving water," 1680s, so called by its inventor, but the word was not in common use until 1805 and the rise of the steamboat with a side-mounted paddle-wheel turned by steam power for the propulsion of the vessel, from paddle (n.) + wheel (n.).

Related entries & more 
paddock (n.1)

"a toad, a frog," late 14c., paddok (late 12c. as a surname), probably a diminutive of pad "toad," from Old Norse padda; from Proto-Germanic *pado- "toad" (source also of Swedish padda, Danish padde, Old Frisian and Middle Dutch padde "frog, toad," also Dutch schildpad "tortoise"), of unknown origin and with no certain cognates outside Germanic. Paddock-stool was an old name for a toadstool (mid-15c.). Pad in the straw was a 16c.-17c. expression meaning "something wrong, hidden danger."

Related entries & more 
paddock (n.2)

"a small field or enclosure," 1620s, apparently an alteration of Middle English parrock, from Old English pearroc "enclosed space, fence" (see park (n.)). Or possibly from Medieval Latin parricus (8c.), which ultimately is from Germanic. Especially a small pastured enclosure near a stable.

Related entries & more 
paddy (n.1)

1620s, "rice plant," from Malay (Austronesian) padi "rice in the straw." Main modern meaning "rice field, ground where rice is growing" (1948) is a shortening of paddy field.

Related entries & more 
Paddy (n.2)

"an Irishman," 1780, slang, from the pet form of the common Irish proper name Patrick (Irish Padraig). It was in use in African-American vernacular by 1946 for any "white person." Paddy-wagon is attested by 1930, perhaps so called because many police officers were Irish. Paddywhack (1811) originally meant "an Irishman;" with the second element apparently added vaguely for emphasis.

Related entries & more 

Page 5