Etymology
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osteo- 
before vowels oste-, word-forming element meaning "bone, bones," from Greek osteon "bone," from PIE root *ost- "bone."
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oscitation (n.)

"act of yawning," 1540s, from Late Latin oscitationem (nominative oscitatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of oscitare "to gape, yawn" (see oscitant).

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osteology (n.)

"the branch of anatomy which treats of the bones," 1660s, from French ostèologie, from Modern Latin osteologia, from Greek osteon "bone" (from PIE root *ost- "bone") + -logia (see -logy). Related: Osteologist; osteological.

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Ossetian 

1877 as an adjective, "of pr pertaining to the Ossetes, a people of the Caucasus Mountains, or to their Iranian (Indo-European) language. From 1814 as a noun.

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ostracize (v.)

"exile by ostracism, banish by popular vote," also in a figurative sense, "to exclude from society or favor," 1640s, from Latinized form of Greek ostrakizein "to banish," literally "to banish by voting with potshards" (see ostracism). Related: Ostracization; ostracized; ostracizing.

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oscine (adj.)
"of or pertaining to the singing birds," 1872, from Modern Latin Oscines, the scientific name of the suborder, from Latin oscen (gentitive oscinis) "songbird, bird giving omens by its cry, from assimilated form of ob- "in front of, before" (see ob-) + canere "to sing" (from PIE root *kan- "to sing").
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Ostrogoth (n.)

c. 1600 (Ostrogothes, plural, is attested from late 14c.), one of the "East Goths," the more easterly of the two great divisions of the Gothic tribe, who conquered Italy late 5c. and established, under Theodric, a kingdom there that lasted from 493 to 555 C.E., from Medieval Latin Ostrogothæ, from Germanic, perhaps literally "eastern Goths" from Proto-Germanic *austra- "east" (from PIE root *aus- (1) "to shine," on the notion of "toward sunrise"), but according to Klein's sources the first element might be literal: "shining" or "splendid." For second element, see Goth, and compare Visigoth. Related: Ostrogothic.

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oscitate (v.)

"to yawn, gape with sleepiness," 1620s, from Latin oscitatus, past-participle of oscitare, oscitari "to gape, yawn" (see oscitant).

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osteitis (n.)

"inflammation of bone," by 1825; see osteo- "bone" + -itis "inflammation." Related: Osteitic.

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Osco- 

combining form of Oscan (q.v.).

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