Etymology
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ill-advised (adj.)
1590s, from ill (adv.) + advised, past-participle adjective from advise (v.) in its original (but now obsolete) reflexive sense "take thought, consider." Related: Ill-advisedly.
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jaywalking (n.)
by 1912, American English (said in original citation to be a Kansas City term), from jay, perhaps with notion of boldness and impudence. Related: Jaywalk; jaywalker.
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handmaid (n.)
"female servant," c. 1300, from hand (n.) in the sense in close at hand + maid. Compare Old English handþegn "personal attendant" and the original sense of handsome.
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ahoy (interj.)
also a hoy, 1751, from a (probably merely a preliminary sound) + hoy, a nautical call used in hauling. The original form of the greeting seems to have been ho, the ship ahoy!
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boob tube (n.)
"television set," U.S. slang, by 1965, from boob "stupid person" + slang tube (n.) "television, television programming;" the original sets had vacuum tubes in them.
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exsert (v.)
"to thrust forth, protrude," 1660s, biologists' variant of exert (q.v.) based on the original Latin form. Also as an adjective, "projecting beyond the surrounding parts." Related: Exsertion.
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kersey (n.)
type of coarse woolen cloth, common 14c.-16c., late 14c., said to be from the name of the village in Suffolk, which supposedly is connected with the original manufacture of the cloth.
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bestir (v.)
Old English bestyrian "to heap up," from be- + stir. The original sense apparently is obsolete; the meaning "take brisk or vigorous action" is from c. 1300. Related: Bestirred; bestirring.
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pud (n.1)

slang for "penis," 1939 (in James Joyce), according to OED and DAS from pudding (q.v.) in the same slang sense (1719), an extended use from the original "sausage" meaning of that word.

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bouillabaisse (n.)
type of fish chowder, 1845, from French bouillabaisse (19c.), from Provençal bouiabaisso, boulh-abaisso, a compound of two verbs corresponding to English boil (v.) + abase (in the original sense of "to lower").
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